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Tag Archives: Alright Nan

Poetry Freeforall: Better Than Candy

7:53 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Joy to the World sung by Three Dog Night

Hello, my pretties… cackle… Oops, sorry. Getting into my persona early. I suspect most of the prompts will be tied to Halloween in some way. I may keep count. Let’s go.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie presents its usual bounty of poetry and prose prompts: fairytales, haiku, shadormas, and more. The prompt that caught my eye this week is an image from Diphylla@Deviant Art. In fact, we have many images to work from. Head on over.

sepia sat 2Sepia Saturday asks us to feature an event, a tent, a cooking pot or even a name-tag. Let your freedom of interpretation be as extensive as a hungry diner queue and as voluminous as a generous cooking pot. Visit.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl,  Brenda tells us, Pamela, Catherine, and I played word association on Facebook Friday night, and came up with this week’s  Wordle. If you join The Sunday Whirl‘s Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early. Go on over.

pink girl inkOur new entrant is quite something. The site is Pink. Girl. Ink. and they do a lot of stuff that you may want to investigate while over reading the prompt. The menu is on the right, along with brief comments on Saturday’s prompts.

This week’s prompt is many layered and I fell immediately in love with Stacy’s style of presentation. She starts us with a Tom Waits song, sets us in the scene, and then gives us a wordle! Keep in mind that the new prompt goes up tomorrow. Visit.

At The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele focuses on trick or treating and gives us a brief historical context. Go on over.

Anyone can write a limerick, but a good limerick is an entirely other matter. I learned that at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog.  One advantage to writing a limerick, or two, is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has another fun photograph. As I studied it, I kept wanting to know things and that is how many poems start. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Mary gives us a topic that has been popular, judging by the number of responses already in. She talks about broken things. Go see what it’s all about.FPR-200

The Found Poetry Review has a cool idea for a different kind of erasure poem. Our text will be what we overhear. Find out what it’s about.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also, all work for prose. This week’s topics are Halloween Costumes, Monster for Hire, and Haunted House.IGWRTButtonrsz

Imaginary garden with real toads has Fireblossom at the wheel. Her Halloween prompt made me laugh aloud. Go play with the toads.wewritepoems

Red Wolf Poems and Irene gave me a giggle, too. She has an intriguing connection between resurrection and reprise. Head on over to read the whole prompt.

Wordsmith Studio has a weekly prompt. I’m giving you the general prompt URL as they change the prompt later today. This past week’s topic is wicked wording. Go on over to read the prompt and explore the studio.

Poets United Midweek Motif gives us Halloween, or celebrating the dead. Visit to read what Susan says.

dverse-nightime-finalWe’re meeting the bar over at dVerse where Claudia has a post we all should read, even if we don’t write to it. She says, in part, mostly for me it’s about learning to see how the things around us really are instead of assuming they’re like this and that. They’re friendly folks at the Bar, so stick around for some conversation. The hot chocolate is beginning to appear.

Not bad: five Halloween connected prompts. Go to it, poets et al. I shall see you Tuesday for my prompt; Thursday for things narrative; and Friday for the next roundup of prompt sites.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
4 Comments

Posted by on 31/10/2014 in links, poetry

 

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Poetry Freeforall: Write, Write, Write

8:24 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Watch the Sunrise by Big Star

Hello, everyone. Alright NaNoWriMo-ers, it’s time to start warming up. You might focus on the sites that have prose options. The rest of us can continue to revel in poetry prompts. [What’s that? No. No revelling for NaNoWriMo-ers. They aren’t supposed to enjoy November]

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie presents its usual bounty of poetry and prose prompts: fairytales, haiku, shadormas, and more. The prompt that caught my eye this week is using an Oscar Wilds quote as our spark.  Head on over.

sepia sat 2Sepia Saturday has a black and white showing three bobbies (policemen). Suggested topics based on the image are bobbies, bellies, bums, brushes and beards. Visit sunday whirl

The Sunday Whirl is beloved by many. Brenda has a gift for choosing words for her weekly Wordle. If you join The Sunday Whirl‘s Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early. Check it out.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele gives us a chance to practise tension in our poems. She talks about tension a little, gives us a list of techniques that can be employed to create tension, and, in case we are hitting the wall, a list of opening lines to use. Visit.

Anyone can write a limerick, but a good limerick is an entirely other matter. I learned that at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog.  One advantage to writing a limerick, or two, is they are short. You can post them in comments here, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has another fun photograph. I caught myself starting a poem, as I looked at it. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Peggy invites us to play. Go see what it’s all about.FPR-200

The Found Poetry Review asks us to choose one of the many forms of poetry (other than free verse!) and write a poem in that form using a found text. They have a bonus, which is to write a doge-erel [which looks like a lot of fun]. Head over to see what it’s all about.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also, all work for prose. This week’s topics are muse, celebrity encounters, and amazing facts.IGWRTButtonrsz

Imaginary garden with real toads has herotomost in the house and he wants us to recall those few things that turned your crank when you were young were so consuming, so intoxicating. He wants to know what was our thing. Go play with the toads.

Red Wolf Poems and Misky give us a wordle with a twist. Head on over to read the whole prompt.

Wordsmith Studio has a weekly (sometimes every other weekly) prompt. I’m giving you the general prompt URL as they might add this week’s at any moment. This past week’s topic is Curses. Go on over to read the prompt and explore the studio. They have been around a while now (I’m proud to say I have been with them, albeit quietly, from the start) and I’m glad I can show them off.

Poets United Midweek Motif gives us a topic that is quite broad: one day in the life of… Visit to read what Susan says.

dverse-nightime-finalWe’re meeting the bar over at dVerse where Tony Maude offers one of my favourite forms, the list poem. They’re friendly folks at the Bar, so stick around for some conversation.

Go to it, poets et al. I shall see you Tuesday for an image prompt; Thursday for links; and Friday for the next roundup of prompt sites.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
8 Comments

Posted by on 24/10/2014 in links, poetry

 

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