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Poetry Freeforall: A New Year, A New Start

10:00 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to traffic shushing on wet roads

Well, hello everyone. I know I am back earlier than I said I would be but I thought it would be nice to start the new year with the first prompts of the year. Some places won’t be back yet, but I’ll leave a note to indicate such. I hope you all had a good sign-off to 2014 and are looking forward to 2015, as I am. Let’s see who’s home.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie  The prompt that caught my eye this week is one about summer camp. One way or another most of us have participated in some form of organised summer activity. I was also drawn to the two image prompts. To find out what the prompts are about visit them.

sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl,  Brenda gives us a final set of words for the past year. They are interesting. Go Wordle. If you join The Sunday Whirl‘s Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early.

pink girl ink Pink.Girl.Ink. Returning tomorrow. Check them out then.

 

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, also returns tomorrow. Check for Adele’s first post of the year.

Feeling a little -ish still? Then head to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. I defy you to not enjoy writing a good limerick. One advantage to writing a limerick, or two, is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has a photograph of a storefront. If you aren’t feeling the pink, remember that you do not have to write about the whole, or write about the image directly. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Returning January 6.FPR-200

At the Found Poetry Review we have an echo of last year’s April Oulipost challenge. If you didn’t participate and have wondered about it, here’s your chance: As you head into 2015, take a look back at the year’s big news and write a found poem… Go on over for more of the prompt.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also all work for prose. This week’s topics are lighten up, digging deep, and looking ahead. Visit to find out what the prompts are about.IGWRTButtonrsz

Susie, at imaginary garden with real toads, has given us five quotes to do with a new year. Go play with the toads.wewritepoems

Sad news at Red Wolf Poems where they are closing the doors on the prompt site. For all of us who have followed them since the days of We Write Poems, they will be missed as much for the friendships within the group as for their prompts. Barbara has given us one final prompt. As always with her prompts for Red Wolf, the prompt is twisty and fun to play with. Go on over to read, to write a farewell poem, to say goodbye.

Poets United Midweek Motif returns in the new year.

dverse-nightime-finalOver at dVerse they’re out ’til early in the new year.

 

I shall see you Tuesday for a prompt; Thursday for links and some words to the new followers I haven’t spoken to yet; and Friday for more prompt site roundups.

Happy writing, everyone. It always feels good to come back.

 

 
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Posted by on 02/01/2015 in exercises, links, poetry

 

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Poetry Freeforall

9:44 a.m. — Atlanta

watching and listening to something my uncle sent round and decided you needed to see it too. I wonder how long it took them to rehearse.

Hello, everyone. Ready for some linking and prompting and writing? Let’s go.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie  The prompt that caught my eye this week is Tale Weaver’s Prompt: The Funeral of Al Na’ash. I love the title. To find out what the prompt is about visit them.

sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl,  Brenda gives us a set of words that all have the same vowel sound. Go Wordle. If you join The Sunday Whirl‘s Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early.

pink girl ink  Pink. Girl. Ink. gives us an image. It is a lovely photograph of snowfall, so head over to see it and to see if it inspires.

At The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele announces her winter hiatus, but she gives us presents, too. To see and enjoy all the things she has under the tree for us, visit.

I am struck anew at how clever some of the limericks are at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. I defy you to not enjoy writing a good limerick. One advantage to writing a limerick, or two, is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has a photograph by Elene Usdin. I laughed as soon as it flashed on my screen and laughed again. I find it enchanting. Some might find it alarming. I notice that the number of entrants is small which usually means people aren’t sure quite what to do. Remember that you do not have to write about the whole, or write about the image directly. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Peggy gives us quiet. Visit.FPR-200

At the Found Poetry Review Beth has a cool prompt for us to try that involves a mirror universe. Go read what she has to say. Very cool.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also, all work for prose. This week’s topics are a day in the life, learning to cook, and whimsical creature.IGWRTButtonrsz

Hannah, at imaginary garden with real toads asks us to transform with Lake Hillier. Wait ’til you see the photographs. Can anyone say Pepto Bismol? Go play with the toads.wewritepoems

At Red Wolf Poems Barbara has a fun exercise for us to try. It’s one of my favourite prompts (ones similar). To remember your past, head on over to read the whole prompt.

Poets United Midweek Motif asks us to focus on human rights. Susan has chosen some intriguing quotes, gives us a couple of ideas (one of which I find fascinating), and has a video. Head over to see what it’s all about.

dverse-nightime-finalOver at dVerse we’re in Poetics with Gabriella who wants us to think about city songs. Visit to read what she says and to read the poems she includes as examples. They’re friendly folks at the Bar, so stick around for some conversation.

I shall see you Tuesday for a prompt; and then, not again until January 6. Originally I had said the 30th of December, but apparently, I will be in the car that day.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
6 Comments

Posted by on 12/12/2014 in links, poetry

 

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Poetry Freeforall: Pick One or Two

7:44 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to the throaty roar of a successful liftoff

Hello, everyone. Orion has left the ground and is getting ready to run through a couple of exercises, before taking off on its own to make a different kind of poetry. I can tell you that having the pre-launch chatter and the live video is quite addicting. Shall we investigate one of our addictions?

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie  The prompt that caught my eye this week is the one asking us to embody the meaning of the Korean word ‘won’. Also, if you have ever had a desire to try your hand at a prompt or two [or have and want to help], they are looking for people to write prompts during the holidays. The information is within this particular prompt.

sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl,  Brenda gives us a challenging set of words to play with. Go Wordle. If you join The Sunday Whirl‘s Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early.

pink girl ink  Pink. Girl. Ink. gives a straightforward prompt about thankfulness. To read the rest of the prompt, visit.

At The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele has Diane Lockward as a guest prompter. Diane’s focus is language, our choice of words when writing, and she has a gorgeous poem to use as an example. The prompt looks like fun, a bit of work, but fun. Go on over.

I am struck anew at how clever some of the limericks are at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. I defy you to not enjoy writing a good limerick. One advantage to writing a limerick, or two, is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has Bond of Union, by Escher. I adore anything Escher and this one is open to several possibilities. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Laurie Kolp talks to us about hands. Visit.FPR-200

At the Found Poetry Review Beth starts with, Select three or more titles and write a poem using only the text in the Book Concierge blurb. Titles of what, you ask. Go find out.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also, all work for prose. This week’s topics are feasting, World of Toys, and secret keeper.IGWRTButtonrsz

 Fireblossom, at imaginary garden with real toads wants us to really play. She wants us to try a mashup of a different sort. Can you say, Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Hunter? Go play with the toads.wewritepoems

At Red Wolf Poems Misky creates this week’s wordle twist with a simple addition to the word list. Head on over to read the whole prompt.

Poets United Midweek Motif has a very interesting focus to do with a date. Intriguing. Susan has some quotes and a couple of poems to give us a start. Go over.

dverse-nightime-finalWe’re meeting the bar over at dVerse with Tony Maude who wants us to look at buzzwords and jargon. Go on over to read what he says. They’re friendly folks at the Bar, so stick around for some conversation.

I shall see you Tuesday for a flower prompt; Thursday for links and such; and Friday for the next roundup.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
8 Comments

Posted by on 05/12/2014 in links, poetry

 

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Poetry Freeforall: Take Your Time

10:35 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Walter Martin singing You Sing to Me — my new favourite singer. My son’s blog came out a little earlier this morning and he has two songs by Martin. I fell in love with his voice.

Hello, everyone. Yes, yes, I did sleep in. Yes, this is last week’s opening, but … I slept in. So, let’s go. NaNoWriMo-ers, come on. You are so close. Dig deeper.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie presents its usual bounty of poetry and prose prompts: fairytales, haiku, shadormas, and more. The prompt that caught my eye this week is the counterpoint to last week’s instruction manual for the dead (how much fun is that!). Head on over.

sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl,  Brenda gives us a fun set of words to play with. Go Wordle. If you join The Sunday Whirl‘s Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early.

pink girl ink  Pink. Girl. Ink. asks us to look back at our childhood, for those moments of childhood magic. To read the rest of the prompt, visit.

At The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele says, let’s just write a tribute about, or to, a personal hero or heroine (past or present). She has a list of suggestions, guidelines, and tips, all of which allow for many possibilities. Go on over.

Feeling a little grey? Your poetry not arriving? Then, you should be at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. I defy you to not enjoy writing a good limerick. One advantage to writing a limerick, or two, is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has a photograph that is open to literal and symbolic interpretations. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Brian(!) talks to us about identity. Visit.FPR-200

The Found Poetry Review asks us to write a poem with Oxford Dictionary’s words of the year. Find out what it’s about.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also, all work for prose. This week’s topics are Simple Twist of Fate, Surrealism, and Word on the Street.IGWRTButtonrsz

 I love what Margaret gives us at imaginary garden with real toads where she has taken a painting of a still life and broken the images down to details. It’s cool, so go look and find out what she wants us to do. Go play with the toads.wewritepoems

At Red Wolf Poems Nic creates this week’s wordle twist and what a twist! It should be great fun. Head on over to read the whole prompt.

Poets United Midweek Motif gives us health. Susan has some quotes and a couple of ideas to give us a start. Go over.

dverse-nightime-finalWe’re meeting the bar over at dVerse with Bjorn who wants us to look at defamiliarisation in our poetry. Go on over to read what he says. They’re friendly folks at the Bar, so stick around for some conversation.

I shall see you Tuesday for an image prompt; Thursday and Friday are dark; and the following Tuesday for a poetry prompt.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
2 Comments

Posted by on 21/11/2014 in links, poetry

 

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Poetry Freeforall

10:18 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Harry Belafonte singing Crawdad Song

Hello, everyone. Yes, yes, I did sleep in. It happens [not often, mind you]. I’ll spend the day recovering from actual sleep, but listening to Belafonte helps a whole lot. Meanwhile, NaNoWriMo-ers, you are at the halfway point. Dig in.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie presents its usual bounty of poetry and prose prompts: fairytales, haiku, shadormas, and more. The prompt that caught my eye this week is, well, all of them. I love the idea of leaving haiku around the neighbourhood; I love writing poetry inspired by Metallica‘s work; the photo looks nifty… Head on over.

sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl,  Brenda gives us an intriguing set of words to play with. Go Wordle. If you join The Sunday Whirl‘s Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early.

pink girl ink  Pink. Girl. Ink. has a fun image, created by Stacy, who gives us a choice of first lines to use with the image [she is open to modification of the lines] and reminds us that we can write poems or flash fiction. I am loving the creativity of her prompts. Visit.

At The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, we have a hefty post, well worth reading. Adele presents a ‘discussion’ of spiritual poetry, with thoughts from several writers. She quotes Jane Hirschfield, “The root of ‘spirit’ is the Latin spirare, to breathe. Whatever lives on the breath, then, must have its spiritual dimension—including all poems, even the most unlikely.” I thought that was cool. If you aren’t sure it’s going to be your thing, scroll down to her guidelines and tips and read them. Go on over.

Feeling a little grey? Your poetry not arriving? Then, you should be at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. I defy you to not enjoy writing a good limerick. One advantage to writing a limerick, or two, is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has a photograph aimed at this week’s celebrations of veterans and their contributions. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Sumana has some fabulous images and a couple of thoughtful comments on dreams. Visit.FPR-200

The Found Poetry Review has found a beauty for us to Apply any constraint or found poetry technique in a way that will make you important to your friends and gaily, poisonously attractive to your enemies! Yep, you will not be able to resist seeing what that’s about will you? The source material is good for at least a laugh, but I think it will be a fun piece to work with. Find out what it’s about.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also, all work for prose. This week’s topics are Helping Hand, The Berlin Wall, and Your Shadow.IGWRTButtonrsz

 I have given you the general address for Imaginary garden with real toads where we are offered prompts created around Freddie Mercury’s Love of My Life and Don McLean’s American Pie. Well, of course I stopped for a moment to listen. I fell in love with Freddie Mercury all over again. Go play with the toads.wewritepoems

At Red Wolf Poems Irene‘s title for the post is Still life with oysters (part one) and abalones (part two). Head on over to read the whole prompt.

Poets United Midweek Motif gives us swimming. Susan has some wonderful images to spark poems.  Visit to read what Susan says.

dverse-nightime-finalWe’re meeting the bar over at dVerse with Victoria who wants us to play with art techniques in our poetry. Go on over to read what she says. They’re friendly folks at the Bar, so stick around for some conversation. I smell cinnamon. Is it hot apple cider time?

I shall see you Tuesday for my next narrative prompt; Thursday for more things narrative; and Friday for the next roundup of prompt sites.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
3 Comments

Posted by on 14/11/2014 in links, poetry

 

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Poetry Freeforall: So Many Choices

7:44 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to the songs my son has rounded up as his year’s favourites — this is how I keep a toe in the 21st c.and I often surprise myself, as in I will now have songs on my playlists by The Harpoonist and The Axe Murderer [I feel so with it]

Hello, everyone. I hope your day looks as lovely outside as mine. Not, mind you, that I go outside, but it still looks lovely. One week down, already, NaNoWriMo-ers and you’re feeling good.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie presents its usual bounty of poetry and prose prompts: fairytales, haiku, shadormas, and more. The prompt that caught my eye this week is an image from Matilda Emgård. The thumbnail caught and held my attention. The close-up has me Googling her as I write this. Head on over.

sepia sat 2Sepia Saturday seems to have mostly photographs as responses, although they consistently ask for poetry, also. Is anyone out there using their prompts? I like their narrator; I like their idea; but if no-one is writing to their photos, we can always use the space.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl,  Brenda gives us an interesting set of words to play with. One of those where the challenge is to use them in some fresh way. Go Wordle. If you join The Sunday Whirl‘s Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early.

pink girl inkOur new entrant is quite something. The site is Pink. Girl. Ink. and they do a lot of stuff that you may want to investigate while over reading the prompt. The menu is on the right, along with brief comments on Saturday’s prompts.

This week’s prompt is a Wordle. If you like to be at the beginning of a prompt week, they will change it tomorrow. Visit.

At The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, we are holding.

Anyone can write a limerick, but a good limerick is an entirely other matter. I learned that at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog.  One advantage to writing a limerick, or two, is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has an… interesting photograph. I’m not sure I like it, but it holds my attention and I can see that the poems that come from it can go in several directions. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Alan1704 wants us to consider the humble pebble. Visit.FPR-200

The Found Poetry Review gives us the short short illustrated story “The Old, Rough Stone and the Gnarled Tree” (it’s about an old rough stone and an old gnarled tree), and asks us to try an erasure poem. Find out what it’s about.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also, all work for prose. This week’s topics are Songs From Your Past, Treason, and Death as a Symbol.IGWRTButtonrsz

Imaginary garden with real toads has Hannah transforming our Fridays with Antelope Canyon. Along with brief details about the canyon, she includes a clip of a piece of Navajo music, which makes her happy. I am listening to it now. It makes me happy, too, Hannah. Go play with the toads.wewritepoems

It’s wordle week at Red Wolf Poems and Misky adds a couple of twists  to the wordle that have me thinking. Head on over to read the whole prompt.

Wordsmith Studio is on hold.

Poets United Midweek Motif gives us bonfires, a word I love. Did you know it derives from bone + fire?  Visit to read what Susan says.

dverse-nightime-finalWe’re meeting the bar over at dVerse with Gay and her fascination with the word fair. She brings in a number of possibilities for us, to include the homophone. They’re friendly folks at the Bar, so stick around for some conversation. The hot chocolate is beginning to appear.

Done and Done. I shall see you Tuesday for my prompt; Thursday for things narrative; and Friday for the next roundup of prompt sites.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
5 Comments

Posted by on 07/11/2014 in links, poetry

 

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Poetry Freeforall: Better Than Candy

7:53 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Joy to the World sung by Three Dog Night

Hello, my pretties… cackle… Oops, sorry. Getting into my persona early. I suspect most of the prompts will be tied to Halloween in some way. I may keep count. Let’s go.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie presents its usual bounty of poetry and prose prompts: fairytales, haiku, shadormas, and more. The prompt that caught my eye this week is an image from Diphylla@Deviant Art. In fact, we have many images to work from. Head on over.

sepia sat 2Sepia Saturday asks us to feature an event, a tent, a cooking pot or even a name-tag. Let your freedom of interpretation be as extensive as a hungry diner queue and as voluminous as a generous cooking pot. Visit.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl,  Brenda tells us, Pamela, Catherine, and I played word association on Facebook Friday night, and came up with this week’s  Wordle. If you join The Sunday Whirl‘s Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early. Go on over.

pink girl inkOur new entrant is quite something. The site is Pink. Girl. Ink. and they do a lot of stuff that you may want to investigate while over reading the prompt. The menu is on the right, along with brief comments on Saturday’s prompts.

This week’s prompt is many layered and I fell immediately in love with Stacy’s style of presentation. She starts us with a Tom Waits song, sets us in the scene, and then gives us a wordle! Keep in mind that the new prompt goes up tomorrow. Visit.

At The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele focuses on trick or treating and gives us a brief historical context. Go on over.

Anyone can write a limerick, but a good limerick is an entirely other matter. I learned that at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog.  One advantage to writing a limerick, or two, is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has another fun photograph. As I studied it, I kept wanting to know things and that is how many poems start. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Mary gives us a topic that has been popular, judging by the number of responses already in. She talks about broken things. Go see what it’s all about.FPR-200

The Found Poetry Review has a cool idea for a different kind of erasure poem. Our text will be what we overhear. Find out what it’s about.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also, all work for prose. This week’s topics are Halloween Costumes, Monster for Hire, and Haunted House.IGWRTButtonrsz

Imaginary garden with real toads has Fireblossom at the wheel. Her Halloween prompt made me laugh aloud. Go play with the toads.wewritepoems

Red Wolf Poems and Irene gave me a giggle, too. She has an intriguing connection between resurrection and reprise. Head on over to read the whole prompt.

Wordsmith Studio has a weekly prompt. I’m giving you the general prompt URL as they change the prompt later today. This past week’s topic is wicked wording. Go on over to read the prompt and explore the studio.

Poets United Midweek Motif gives us Halloween, or celebrating the dead. Visit to read what Susan says.

dverse-nightime-finalWe’re meeting the bar over at dVerse where Claudia has a post we all should read, even if we don’t write to it. She says, in part, mostly for me it’s about learning to see how the things around us really are instead of assuming they’re like this and that. They’re friendly folks at the Bar, so stick around for some conversation. The hot chocolate is beginning to appear.

Not bad: five Halloween connected prompts. Go to it, poets et al. I shall see you Tuesday for my prompt; Thursday for things narrative; and Friday for the next roundup of prompt sites.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
4 Comments

Posted by on 31/10/2014 in links, poetry

 

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Poetry Freeforall: Write, Write, Write

8:24 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Watch the Sunrise by Big Star

Hello, everyone. Alright NaNoWriMo-ers, it’s time to start warming up. You might focus on the sites that have prose options. The rest of us can continue to revel in poetry prompts. [What’s that? No. No revelling for NaNoWriMo-ers. They aren’t supposed to enjoy November]

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie presents its usual bounty of poetry and prose prompts: fairytales, haiku, shadormas, and more. The prompt that caught my eye this week is using an Oscar Wilds quote as our spark.  Head on over.

sepia sat 2Sepia Saturday has a black and white showing three bobbies (policemen). Suggested topics based on the image are bobbies, bellies, bums, brushes and beards. Visit sunday whirl

The Sunday Whirl is beloved by many. Brenda has a gift for choosing words for her weekly Wordle. If you join The Sunday Whirl‘s Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early. Check it out.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele gives us a chance to practise tension in our poems. She talks about tension a little, gives us a list of techniques that can be employed to create tension, and, in case we are hitting the wall, a list of opening lines to use. Visit.

Anyone can write a limerick, but a good limerick is an entirely other matter. I learned that at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog.  One advantage to writing a limerick, or two, is they are short. You can post them in comments here, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has another fun photograph. I caught myself starting a poem, as I looked at it. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Peggy invites us to play. Go see what it’s all about.FPR-200

The Found Poetry Review asks us to choose one of the many forms of poetry (other than free verse!) and write a poem in that form using a found text. They have a bonus, which is to write a doge-erel [which looks like a lot of fun]. Head over to see what it’s all about.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also, all work for prose. This week’s topics are muse, celebrity encounters, and amazing facts.IGWRTButtonrsz

Imaginary garden with real toads has herotomost in the house and he wants us to recall those few things that turned your crank when you were young were so consuming, so intoxicating. He wants to know what was our thing. Go play with the toads.

Red Wolf Poems and Misky give us a wordle with a twist. Head on over to read the whole prompt.

Wordsmith Studio has a weekly (sometimes every other weekly) prompt. I’m giving you the general prompt URL as they might add this week’s at any moment. This past week’s topic is Curses. Go on over to read the prompt and explore the studio. They have been around a while now (I’m proud to say I have been with them, albeit quietly, from the start) and I’m glad I can show them off.

Poets United Midweek Motif gives us a topic that is quite broad: one day in the life of… Visit to read what Susan says.

dverse-nightime-finalWe’re meeting the bar over at dVerse where Tony Maude offers one of my favourite forms, the list poem. They’re friendly folks at the Bar, so stick around for some conversation.

Go to it, poets et al. I shall see you Tuesday for an image prompt; Thursday for links; and Friday for the next roundup of prompt sites.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
8 Comments

Posted by on 24/10/2014 in links, poetry

 

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Poetry Freeforall: It’s That Time

8:29 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to a live feed from Hong Kong

Hello, all. Ready for the roundup? Forgive me if I am abrupt, and if there are typos, or I am less than articulate. Things are getting bad in HK and that is where my attention is focused.

Mindlovemisery presents its usual bounty of poetry and prose prompts: fairytales, haiku, shadormas, and more. The prompt that caught my eye asks us to write about yourself through the eyes of someone else. Head on over.

sepia sat 2Sepia Saturday has a lovely lantern slide image for us to study. The possibilities suggested are: Street traders, roadside artisans, menders, cobblers, tools-of-the-trade, hand-colouring and lantern slides. Or, if you just want to post an old photograph or two, that can be your contribution (which is fun, isn’t it?). Get writing and posting, people. sunday whirl

The Sunday Whirl is beloved by many. Brenda has a gift for choosing words for her weekly Wordle. This week, she tells us, fellow poet Catherine McGregor contributed the words and they are intriguing. I plan to dash over to check the poems created from these words. If you join The Sunday Whirl‘s Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early. Check it out.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele shares the first poem she had to memorise and challenges us to heed what the great poet Marianne Moore once said, “Poetry is all nouns and verbs.”  Adele gives us a noun list and a verb list. Visit to find out what to do with them.

Anyone can write a limerick, but a good limerick is an entirely other matter. I learned that at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. One advantage to writing a limerick, or two, is they are short. You can post them in comments or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has a fun photograph, Self-portrait, by Vivian Maier. The more I studied it the more portraits I spotted. There are a number of interesting possible commentaries to spark a poem from this. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Laurie Kolp wants us to consider graveyards. Cemeteries are one of my favourite places to visit, to stroll through and read the brief histories. Go check out what Laurie has to say.FPR-200

The Found Poetry Review give us a chance to play with another underrated form, one difficult to do well, the acrostic [it helps if you write a longform and don’t capitalise the beginning of every line] Head over to see what it’s all about.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also, all work for prose. This week’s topics are blood moon, story in a song, and super powers.IGWRTButtonrsz

Imaginary garden with real toads has a prompt I could not resist. I ignored the one with lovely marble statues and went with Isadora and her request that we imagine a world where the Zombie Revolution is upon us, and you have holed up in a bunker, which you cannot leave. I mean, really. How can you resist? Visit to read  the whole. Go play with the toads.

Red Wolf Poems and Barbara give us another hard to resist prompt: Write a Gilligan poem. Again, I mean really. Head on over to read the whole prompt.

Yes, yes this is a new entry. Wordsmith Studio has a weekly (sometimes every other weekly) prompt. This week’s is A wordsmith studioDark and Stormy Night. Go on over to read the prompt and explore the studio. They have been around a while now (I’m proud to say I have been with them, albeit quietly, from the start) and I’m glad I can show them off.

Poets United Midweek Motif gives us a topic that many of you are particularly fond of, trees. This time, Susan accompanies the motif with poems and several van Gogh paintings of trees. Visit to read what Susan says.

dverse-nightime-finalWe’re meeting the bar over at dVerse where we have a fairly new form to try: The Pleiades. They’re friendly folks at the Bar, so stick around for some conversation.

Go to it, poets et al. I shall see you Tuesday for a word prompt; Thursday for links; and Friday for the next roundup of prompt sites.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
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Posted by on 17/10/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall: Grab Bag

7:45 a.m. –Atlanta

listening to Growing Up sung by Run River North

Hello, all. It’s October. Ahem NaNoWriMo-ers: time to start warming up. One way is to do all the narrative prompts as an exercise. The rest of us? Play, of course!

Mindlovemisery has a number of narrative prompts, that are fun into the bargain. They range from fairy tales to scary tales and will stretch your tonal muscles and give you some practice in structuring a story. Strictly poetry people, I spotted two image prompts, a wordle, and a couple of short form prompts. Such largesse! Head on over.

sepia sat 2Sepia Saturday gives us a Rockwell painting for this week’s spark  Marilyn also says, I’ll just mention that there is a Facebook group for Sepia Saturday contributors. Why not join us as we have a lot of fun and post some interesting items there. You will need to have posted on Sepia Saturday at least once; then we’ll welcome you with open arms. Get writing and posting, people. sunday whirl

The Sunday Whirl is beloved by many. Brenda has a gift for choosing words for her weekly Wordle. This week, she tells us, Fellow poet Pamela Kaler Sayers engaged in a word association with me to come up with this week’s words. If you join The Sunday Whirl‘s Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early. Check it out.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele has a guest prompter, Peter Murphy (whose writing getaway I am determined to get to this year). Peter is talking postcard poems and apologies. Visit.

Anyone can write a limerick, but a good limerick is an entirely other matter. I learned that at Mad Kane’s Humor BlogMadeleine gives us a limerick she has written and our challenge is to use the same first line. She always gives a little wiggle room. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has a lovely paintingAutumn in Madeira by Jacek Yerka. Look at this one a while. It’s a charming piece and the more I look at it, the more I see. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Sumana gives us a little magic to play with. See what she says on the topic and think of all the ways magic has been part of your life. FPR-200

 

The Found Poetry Review has a fun prompt. Okay, yes, I think they’re all fun, but this made me want to stop writing and try it right now. The title is dissonance but maybe not in the way you think of the word. Head over to see what it’s all about.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also, all work for prose. This week’s topics are autumn almanac, waterfall and the flip side.IGWRTButtonrsz

Imaginary garden with real toads has a couple of prompts that I couldn’t choose between, so you get the general address and you can make the decision [or do both]. One prompt is an offering from Hannah, which means a spectacular piece of nature; the second is from Mama Zen and has to do with personification, a difficult technique to do well. Go play with the toads.

Red Wolf Poems gives us prompts rich in detail and depth. Barbara talks about technology from a couple of different perspectives and then gives us an exercise that uses technology as a detail, not the poem’s core topic. Interesting. Head on over to read the whole prompt.

Poets United Midweek Motif presents us with a motif each week. Susan accompanies the motif with quotes, photographs, and the occasional video, to spark ideas. This week’s motif is children’s books. Visit to read what Susan says.

dverse-nightime-finalHey! Oulipoemers, here’s one for us! Those who have not written an oulipo poem, try it. dVerse focuses on N+7, but also say that we can pick our own form of constraint. They’re friendly folks at the Bar, so stick around for some conversation.

Go to it, poets et al. I shall see you Tuesday for a word prompt; Thursday for links; and Friday for the next roundup of prompt sites.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
15 Comments

Posted by on 03/10/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

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