RSS

Tag Archives: sepia saturday

Poetry Freeforall

10:18 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Harry Belafonte singing Crawdad Song

Hello, everyone. Yes, yes, I did sleep in. It happens [not often, mind you]. I’ll spend the day recovering from actual sleep, but listening to Belafonte helps a whole lot. Meanwhile, NaNoWriMo-ers, you are at the halfway point. Dig in.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie presents its usual bounty of poetry and prose prompts: fairytales, haiku, shadormas, and more. The prompt that caught my eye this week is, well, all of them. I love the idea of leaving haiku around the neighbourhood; I love writing poetry inspired by Metallica‘s work; the photo looks nifty… Head on over.

sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl,  Brenda gives us an intriguing set of words to play with. Go Wordle. If you join The Sunday Whirl‘s Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early.

pink girl ink  Pink. Girl. Ink. has a fun image, created by Stacy, who gives us a choice of first lines to use with the image [she is open to modification of the lines] and reminds us that we can write poems or flash fiction. I am loving the creativity of her prompts. Visit.

At The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, we have a hefty post, well worth reading. Adele presents a ‘discussion’ of spiritual poetry, with thoughts from several writers. She quotes Jane Hirschfield, “The root of ‘spirit’ is the Latin spirare, to breathe. Whatever lives on the breath, then, must have its spiritual dimension—including all poems, even the most unlikely.” I thought that was cool. If you aren’t sure it’s going to be your thing, scroll down to her guidelines and tips and read them. Go on over.

Feeling a little grey? Your poetry not arriving? Then, you should be at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. I defy you to not enjoy writing a good limerick. One advantage to writing a limerick, or two, is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has a photograph aimed at this week’s celebrations of veterans and their contributions. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Sumana has some fabulous images and a couple of thoughtful comments on dreams. Visit.FPR-200

The Found Poetry Review has found a beauty for us to Apply any constraint or found poetry technique in a way that will make you important to your friends and gaily, poisonously attractive to your enemies! Yep, you will not be able to resist seeing what that’s about will you? The source material is good for at least a laugh, but I think it will be a fun piece to work with. Find out what it’s about.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also, all work for prose. This week’s topics are Helping Hand, The Berlin Wall, and Your Shadow.IGWRTButtonrsz

 I have given you the general address for Imaginary garden with real toads where we are offered prompts created around Freddie Mercury’s Love of My Life and Don McLean’s American Pie. Well, of course I stopped for a moment to listen. I fell in love with Freddie Mercury all over again. Go play with the toads.wewritepoems

At Red Wolf Poems Irene‘s title for the post is Still life with oysters (part one) and abalones (part two). Head on over to read the whole prompt.

Poets United Midweek Motif gives us swimming. Susan has some wonderful images to spark poems.  Visit to read what Susan says.

dverse-nightime-finalWe’re meeting the bar over at dVerse with Victoria who wants us to play with art techniques in our poetry. Go on over to read what she says. They’re friendly folks at the Bar, so stick around for some conversation. I smell cinnamon. Is it hot apple cider time?

I shall see you Tuesday for my next narrative prompt; Thursday for more things narrative; and Friday for the next roundup of prompt sites.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
3 Comments

Posted by on 14/11/2014 in links, poetry

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Poetry Freeforall: So Many Choices

7:44 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to the songs my son has rounded up as his year’s favourites — this is how I keep a toe in the 21st c.and I often surprise myself, as in I will now have songs on my playlists by The Harpoonist and The Axe Murderer [I feel so with it]

Hello, everyone. I hope your day looks as lovely outside as mine. Not, mind you, that I go outside, but it still looks lovely. One week down, already, NaNoWriMo-ers and you’re feeling good.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie presents its usual bounty of poetry and prose prompts: fairytales, haiku, shadormas, and more. The prompt that caught my eye this week is an image from Matilda Emgård. The thumbnail caught and held my attention. The close-up has me Googling her as I write this. Head on over.

sepia sat 2Sepia Saturday seems to have mostly photographs as responses, although they consistently ask for poetry, also. Is anyone out there using their prompts? I like their narrator; I like their idea; but if no-one is writing to their photos, we can always use the space.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl,  Brenda gives us an interesting set of words to play with. One of those where the challenge is to use them in some fresh way. Go Wordle. If you join The Sunday Whirl‘s Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early.

pink girl inkOur new entrant is quite something. The site is Pink. Girl. Ink. and they do a lot of stuff that you may want to investigate while over reading the prompt. The menu is on the right, along with brief comments on Saturday’s prompts.

This week’s prompt is a Wordle. If you like to be at the beginning of a prompt week, they will change it tomorrow. Visit.

At The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, we are holding.

Anyone can write a limerick, but a good limerick is an entirely other matter. I learned that at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog.  One advantage to writing a limerick, or two, is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has an… interesting photograph. I’m not sure I like it, but it holds my attention and I can see that the poems that come from it can go in several directions. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Alan1704 wants us to consider the humble pebble. Visit.FPR-200

The Found Poetry Review gives us the short short illustrated story “The Old, Rough Stone and the Gnarled Tree” (it’s about an old rough stone and an old gnarled tree), and asks us to try an erasure poem. Find out what it’s about.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also, all work for prose. This week’s topics are Songs From Your Past, Treason, and Death as a Symbol.IGWRTButtonrsz

Imaginary garden with real toads has Hannah transforming our Fridays with Antelope Canyon. Along with brief details about the canyon, she includes a clip of a piece of Navajo music, which makes her happy. I am listening to it now. It makes me happy, too, Hannah. Go play with the toads.wewritepoems

It’s wordle week at Red Wolf Poems and Misky adds a couple of twists  to the wordle that have me thinking. Head on over to read the whole prompt.

Wordsmith Studio is on hold.

Poets United Midweek Motif gives us bonfires, a word I love. Did you know it derives from bone + fire?  Visit to read what Susan says.

dverse-nightime-finalWe’re meeting the bar over at dVerse with Gay and her fascination with the word fair. She brings in a number of possibilities for us, to include the homophone. They’re friendly folks at the Bar, so stick around for some conversation. The hot chocolate is beginning to appear.

Done and Done. I shall see you Tuesday for my prompt; Thursday for things narrative; and Friday for the next roundup of prompt sites.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
5 Comments

Posted by on 07/11/2014 in links, poetry

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Poetry Freeforall: Better Than Candy

7:53 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Joy to the World sung by Three Dog Night

Hello, my pretties… cackle… Oops, sorry. Getting into my persona early. I suspect most of the prompts will be tied to Halloween in some way. I may keep count. Let’s go.

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie presents its usual bounty of poetry and prose prompts: fairytales, haiku, shadormas, and more. The prompt that caught my eye this week is an image from Diphylla@Deviant Art. In fact, we have many images to work from. Head on over.

sepia sat 2Sepia Saturday asks us to feature an event, a tent, a cooking pot or even a name-tag. Let your freedom of interpretation be as extensive as a hungry diner queue and as voluminous as a generous cooking pot. Visit.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl,  Brenda tells us, Pamela, Catherine, and I played word association on Facebook Friday night, and came up with this week’s  Wordle. If you join The Sunday Whirl‘s Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early. Go on over.

pink girl inkOur new entrant is quite something. The site is Pink. Girl. Ink. and they do a lot of stuff that you may want to investigate while over reading the prompt. The menu is on the right, along with brief comments on Saturday’s prompts.

This week’s prompt is many layered and I fell immediately in love with Stacy’s style of presentation. She starts us with a Tom Waits song, sets us in the scene, and then gives us a wordle! Keep in mind that the new prompt goes up tomorrow. Visit.

At The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele focuses on trick or treating and gives us a brief historical context. Go on over.

Anyone can write a limerick, but a good limerick is an entirely other matter. I learned that at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog.  One advantage to writing a limerick, or two, is they are short. You can post them in comments on the blog, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has another fun photograph. As I studied it, I kept wanting to know things and that is how many poems start. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Mary gives us a topic that has been popular, judging by the number of responses already in. She talks about broken things. Go see what it’s all about.FPR-200

The Found Poetry Review has a cool idea for a different kind of erasure poem. Our text will be what we overhear. Find out what it’s about.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also, all work for prose. This week’s topics are Halloween Costumes, Monster for Hire, and Haunted House.IGWRTButtonrsz

Imaginary garden with real toads has Fireblossom at the wheel. Her Halloween prompt made me laugh aloud. Go play with the toads.wewritepoems

Red Wolf Poems and Irene gave me a giggle, too. She has an intriguing connection between resurrection and reprise. Head on over to read the whole prompt.

Wordsmith Studio has a weekly prompt. I’m giving you the general prompt URL as they change the prompt later today. This past week’s topic is wicked wording. Go on over to read the prompt and explore the studio.

Poets United Midweek Motif gives us Halloween, or celebrating the dead. Visit to read what Susan says.

dverse-nightime-finalWe’re meeting the bar over at dVerse where Claudia has a post we all should read, even if we don’t write to it. She says, in part, mostly for me it’s about learning to see how the things around us really are instead of assuming they’re like this and that. They’re friendly folks at the Bar, so stick around for some conversation. The hot chocolate is beginning to appear.

Not bad: five Halloween connected prompts. Go to it, poets et al. I shall see you Tuesday for my prompt; Thursday for things narrative; and Friday for the next roundup of prompt sites.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
4 Comments

Posted by on 31/10/2014 in links, poetry

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Poetry Freeforall: Write, Write, Write

8:24 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Watch the Sunrise by Big Star

Hello, everyone. Alright NaNoWriMo-ers, it’s time to start warming up. You might focus on the sites that have prose options. The rest of us can continue to revel in poetry prompts. [What’s that? No. No revelling for NaNoWriMo-ers. They aren’t supposed to enjoy November]

Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie presents its usual bounty of poetry and prose prompts: fairytales, haiku, shadormas, and more. The prompt that caught my eye this week is using an Oscar Wilds quote as our spark.  Head on over.

sepia sat 2Sepia Saturday has a black and white showing three bobbies (policemen). Suggested topics based on the image are bobbies, bellies, bums, brushes and beards. Visit sunday whirl

The Sunday Whirl is beloved by many. Brenda has a gift for choosing words for her weekly Wordle. If you join The Sunday Whirl‘s Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early. Check it out.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele gives us a chance to practise tension in our poems. She talks about tension a little, gives us a list of techniques that can be employed to create tension, and, in case we are hitting the wall, a list of opening lines to use. Visit.

Anyone can write a limerick, but a good limerick is an entirely other matter. I learned that at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog.  One advantage to writing a limerick, or two, is they are short. You can post them in comments here, or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has another fun photograph. I caught myself starting a poem, as I looked at it. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Peggy invites us to play. Go see what it’s all about.FPR-200

The Found Poetry Review asks us to choose one of the many forms of poetry (other than free verse!) and write a poem in that form using a found text. They have a bonus, which is to write a doge-erel [which looks like a lot of fun]. Head over to see what it’s all about.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also, all work for prose. This week’s topics are muse, celebrity encounters, and amazing facts.IGWRTButtonrsz

Imaginary garden with real toads has herotomost in the house and he wants us to recall those few things that turned your crank when you were young were so consuming, so intoxicating. He wants to know what was our thing. Go play with the toads.

Red Wolf Poems and Misky give us a wordle with a twist. Head on over to read the whole prompt.

Wordsmith Studio has a weekly (sometimes every other weekly) prompt. I’m giving you the general prompt URL as they might add this week’s at any moment. This past week’s topic is Curses. Go on over to read the prompt and explore the studio. They have been around a while now (I’m proud to say I have been with them, albeit quietly, from the start) and I’m glad I can show them off.

Poets United Midweek Motif gives us a topic that is quite broad: one day in the life of… Visit to read what Susan says.

dverse-nightime-finalWe’re meeting the bar over at dVerse where Tony Maude offers one of my favourite forms, the list poem. They’re friendly folks at the Bar, so stick around for some conversation.

Go to it, poets et al. I shall see you Tuesday for an image prompt; Thursday for links; and Friday for the next roundup of prompt sites.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
8 Comments

Posted by on 24/10/2014 in links, poetry

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Poetry Freeforall: It’s That Time

8:29 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to a live feed from Hong Kong

Hello, all. Ready for the roundup? Forgive me if I am abrupt, and if there are typos, or I am less than articulate. Things are getting bad in HK and that is where my attention is focused.

Mindlovemisery presents its usual bounty of poetry and prose prompts: fairytales, haiku, shadormas, and more. The prompt that caught my eye asks us to write about yourself through the eyes of someone else. Head on over.

sepia sat 2Sepia Saturday has a lovely lantern slide image for us to study. The possibilities suggested are: Street traders, roadside artisans, menders, cobblers, tools-of-the-trade, hand-colouring and lantern slides. Or, if you just want to post an old photograph or two, that can be your contribution (which is fun, isn’t it?). Get writing and posting, people. sunday whirl

The Sunday Whirl is beloved by many. Brenda has a gift for choosing words for her weekly Wordle. This week, she tells us, fellow poet Catherine McGregor contributed the words and they are intriguing. I plan to dash over to check the poems created from these words. If you join The Sunday Whirl‘s Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early. Check it out.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele shares the first poem she had to memorise and challenges us to heed what the great poet Marianne Moore once said, “Poetry is all nouns and verbs.”  Adele gives us a noun list and a verb list. Visit to find out what to do with them.

Anyone can write a limerick, but a good limerick is an entirely other matter. I learned that at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. One advantage to writing a limerick, or two, is they are short. You can post them in comments or on Mad Kane’s Facebook page. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has a fun photograph, Self-portrait, by Vivian Maier. The more I studied it the more portraits I spotted. There are a number of interesting possible commentaries to spark a poem from this. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Laurie Kolp wants us to consider graveyards. Cemeteries are one of my favourite places to visit, to stroll through and read the brief histories. Go check out what Laurie has to say.FPR-200

The Found Poetry Review give us a chance to play with another underrated form, one difficult to do well, the acrostic [it helps if you write a longform and don’t capitalise the beginning of every line] Head over to see what it’s all about.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also, all work for prose. This week’s topics are blood moon, story in a song, and super powers.IGWRTButtonrsz

Imaginary garden with real toads has a prompt I could not resist. I ignored the one with lovely marble statues and went with Isadora and her request that we imagine a world where the Zombie Revolution is upon us, and you have holed up in a bunker, which you cannot leave. I mean, really. How can you resist? Visit to read  the whole. Go play with the toads.

Red Wolf Poems and Barbara give us another hard to resist prompt: Write a Gilligan poem. Again, I mean really. Head on over to read the whole prompt.

Yes, yes this is a new entry. Wordsmith Studio has a weekly (sometimes every other weekly) prompt. This week’s is A wordsmith studioDark and Stormy Night. Go on over to read the prompt and explore the studio. They have been around a while now (I’m proud to say I have been with them, albeit quietly, from the start) and I’m glad I can show them off.

Poets United Midweek Motif gives us a topic that many of you are particularly fond of, trees. This time, Susan accompanies the motif with poems and several van Gogh paintings of trees. Visit to read what Susan says.

dverse-nightime-finalWe’re meeting the bar over at dVerse where we have a fairly new form to try: The Pleiades. They’re friendly folks at the Bar, so stick around for some conversation.

Go to it, poets et al. I shall see you Tuesday for a word prompt; Thursday for links; and Friday for the next roundup of prompt sites.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
5 Comments

Posted by on 17/10/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Poetry Freeforall: Grab Bag

7:45 a.m. –Atlanta

listening to Growing Up sung by Run River North

Hello, all. It’s October. Ahem NaNoWriMo-ers: time to start warming up. One way is to do all the narrative prompts as an exercise. The rest of us? Play, of course!

Mindlovemisery has a number of narrative prompts, that are fun into the bargain. They range from fairy tales to scary tales and will stretch your tonal muscles and give you some practice in structuring a story. Strictly poetry people, I spotted two image prompts, a wordle, and a couple of short form prompts. Such largesse! Head on over.

sepia sat 2Sepia Saturday gives us a Rockwell painting for this week’s spark  Marilyn also says, I’ll just mention that there is a Facebook group for Sepia Saturday contributors. Why not join us as we have a lot of fun and post some interesting items there. You will need to have posted on Sepia Saturday at least once; then we’ll welcome you with open arms. Get writing and posting, people. sunday whirl

The Sunday Whirl is beloved by many. Brenda has a gift for choosing words for her weekly Wordle. This week, she tells us, Fellow poet Pamela Kaler Sayers engaged in a word association with me to come up with this week’s words. If you join The Sunday Whirl‘s Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early. Check it out.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele has a guest prompter, Peter Murphy (whose writing getaway I am determined to get to this year). Peter is talking postcard poems and apologies. Visit.

Anyone can write a limerick, but a good limerick is an entirely other matter. I learned that at Mad Kane’s Humor BlogMadeleine gives us a limerick she has written and our challenge is to use the same first line. She always gives a little wiggle room. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales has a lovely paintingAutumn in Madeira by Jacek Yerka. Look at this one a while. It’s a charming piece and the more I look at it, the more I see. Head over.Poetry Jam

At Poetry Jam, Sumana gives us a little magic to play with. See what she says on the topic and think of all the ways magic has been part of your life. FPR-200

 

The Found Poetry Review has a fun prompt. Okay, yes, I think they’re all fun, but this made me want to stop writing and try it right now. The title is dissonance but maybe not in the way you think of the word. Head over to see what it’s all about.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. They also, all work for prose. This week’s topics are autumn almanac, waterfall and the flip side.IGWRTButtonrsz

Imaginary garden with real toads has a couple of prompts that I couldn’t choose between, so you get the general address and you can make the decision [or do both]. One prompt is an offering from Hannah, which means a spectacular piece of nature; the second is from Mama Zen and has to do with personification, a difficult technique to do well. Go play with the toads.

Red Wolf Poems gives us prompts rich in detail and depth. Barbara talks about technology from a couple of different perspectives and then gives us an exercise that uses technology as a detail, not the poem’s core topic. Interesting. Head on over to read the whole prompt.

Poets United Midweek Motif presents us with a motif each week. Susan accompanies the motif with quotes, photographs, and the occasional video, to spark ideas. This week’s motif is children’s books. Visit to read what Susan says.

dverse-nightime-finalHey! Oulipoemers, here’s one for us! Those who have not written an oulipo poem, try it. dVerse focuses on N+7, but also say that we can pick our own form of constraint. They’re friendly folks at the Bar, so stick around for some conversation.

Go to it, poets et al. I shall see you Tuesday for a word prompt; Thursday for links; and Friday for the next roundup of prompt sites.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
15 Comments

Posted by on 03/10/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Poetry Freeforall: Come and Get ‘Em

9:07 a.m. –Atlanta

listening to Glen Yarbrough singing Baby the Rain Must Fall — takes me back to fifth or sixth grade, walking to school. I remember exactly where I was when I heard the song. Odd the memories that stick.

Hello, all. Ready for our week of prompts? New people: every Friday I collect the past week of announced prompts and say a little something about each one, so you have a one-stop shop, where you can decide which sounds likely for you to visit. The sites are in order starting with Saturday.

Mindlovemisery, which I introduced last week, starts us off because they have a prompt for every single day of the week. The prompts are a mix of poetry and prose, something for everyone. What I will do is give their general address and mention one or two of the prompts that catch my eye. Each prompt gives us a full week to post. This week, the two that caught my eye are last Sunday’s which involve six word stories. The examples are incredibly powerful. Also, Wednesday looks fun. The prompt gives a poem from a Romantic poet and challenges us to write a haiku inspired by the poem. Visit.

sepia sat 2We have several image prompt sites, now, so I try to make sure each has a different shtick. Sepia Saturday‘s is interesting in that they take their inspiration from old photographs. They also show us what is upcoming in the next two weeks, so our brains can start chewing on ideas. This week, we can respond to the whole photograph, or to tents, towels, turbans, motorbikes, uniforms or any other visual prompt you can find. sunday whirlHead over for a look.

The Sunday Whirl is beloved by many. Brenda has a gift for choosing words for her weekly Wordle. She also happily collects lists from contributors. If you join The Sunday Whirl‘s Facebook page, you can get the week’s list a couple of days early. Check it out.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele suggests: it might be interesting to write a poem that begins with a line by another poet (kind of a new beginning for a previously written line). As she says, not a new idea. What is new are all of Adele’s tips, guidelines, example poems and several suggested lines, in case we don’t have time to go looking. Visit and wander around.

What’s that you say? Limericks are not for you? Then you have not visited Mad Kane’s Humor Blog. Anyone can write a limerick, but a good limerick is an entirely other matter. I learned that here. Madeleine gives us a limerick she has written and our challenge is to use the same first line. She always gives a little wiggle room. Go over and check it out, to read and laugh, and maybe write.magpie

Magpie Tales is one of the most popular image sites, with reason. The images chosen, paintings and photographs, are always intriguing. We are given the choice of a poetry or a prose response. This week’s photograph begs for a story. Head over.Poetry Jam

Alan1704, one of the contributors to Poetry Jam, gives us clouds, this week. Go on over and read what he says about them.FPR-200

 

 

The Found Poetry Review suggests we take on Banned Books Week with an erasure [I like the irony]. They provide a list of titles and make the selection of what to erase easy. Head over to find out what and how. If you have never done an erasure, give it a try. It’s an interesting exercise.

Poets & Writers gives us three prompts every week. One for non-fiction, one for fiction, and one for poetry. My contention is that all the prompts work for poetry. This week’s topics are banned books, false alarms and absences.IGWRTButtonrsz

Imaginary garden with real toads is a wonderful site and when herotomost is in full cry, highly entertaining. If you do nothing else, read his prompt trolling the cosmos for breadcrumbs. Enjoy. If you have the time, wander through the garden looking at their other prompts. Go play with the toads.

Red Wolf Poems does a whole different thing with wordles, this week. Irene discusses major themes in poetry, wewritepoemsparticularly that of death, then suggests a memento mori poem that must include six words found in poems written to last week’s prompt. The words are provided. Wonderfully Byzantine! Head on over to read the whole prompt.

Poets United Midweek Motif presents us with a motif each week. Susan accompanies the motif with quotes, photographs, and the occasional video, to spark ideas. This week’s motif is Heritage Week. Visit to read what Susan says.

dverse-nightime-finalI always feel as if I am coming home when I reach dVerse. In part that’s because they are our anchor prompt site; in part it’s a tribute to the good feeling the site engenders. This week, Gay Reiser Cannon introduces the Quarrel Form [intrigued aren’t you?]. Visit to read how Gay developed the form [yep, it’s original to her] and what you need to do. It looks like a lot of fun. Okay, some work, but a lot of fun. They’re friendly folks at the Bar, so stick around for some conversation.

Enough distractions for you? Go to it, poets et al. I shall see you Tuesday for our image prompt; Thursday for links; and Friday for the next roundup of prompt sites.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
11 Comments

Posted by on 26/09/2014 in exercises, links, poetry, writing

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Poetry Prompts Freeforall: Let Me Introduce You

8:10 a.m. — Atlanta

Listening to Iz singing ‘Ama ‘ama

Surprise! Hello, everyone. I know I didn’t announce the restart of the Freeforall but, when Miz Quickly asked me to not forget her September run, I realised a short entry might be a good way to get back into this. As much as I enjoy writing the list each week, it takes the most time and effort. I was putting off starting and needed a nudge. I’m going to give you a few links, with a little more focus, as I reintroduce the sites. With each Friday, I’ll add a couple.

sepia sat Sepia Saturday is a site I added fairly recently, conscious of the high degree of enjoyment you receive from image prompts. They say of themselves: Launched by Alan Burnett and Kat Mortensen in 2009, Sepia Saturday provides bloggers with an opportunity to share their history through the medium of photographs. Historical photographs of any age or kind (they don’t have to be sepia) become the launchpad for explorations of family history, local history and social history in fact or fiction, poetry or prose, words or further images. If you want to play along, all we ask is that your sign up to the weekly Linky List, that you try to visit as many of the other participants as possible, and that you have fun.

Miz Quickly is a periodic prompt site, but when we have her, we have her for an entire month, so get those pens ready for bunny-bluestarSeptember, when she will be back in action. Here’s what she says:

I don’t believe in writer’s block. Or muses. I do believe in depression, habit, boredom, self-fulfilling prophesy. And Chaos. I believe a poem is a well-constructed box with drawers. Anything can go into it, but if you put all your energy into making the box perfect, the contents will suffer. And if you build a slipshod box…well.

We’re not going to concentrate on building Fabergé eggs. Just some drafts that you can gild and polish later. Now and then, we’ll consider form and function, but most days we’ll be working on the marbles and screws and old silver dimes to stash. Quantities. We want to get you loose-jointed and a little bit crazy. Later, you can work on polish.

FPR-200I added the Found Poetry Review when I realised there are a lot of editors who haven’t caught onto the fact that found poetry is not a fad, or who do not understand found poetry and how it works. That’s how the Review started: Jenni founded the Found Poetry Review in 2011 after receiving a rejection letter in response to her own found poetry submissions, reading “How about next time you try to write something original and not plagiarize someone else’s work for a change!” And when we say “founded,” we mean bought the website domain in the wee hours of the night and felt like it was still a good idea the next morning.

This week’s prompt asks us to play with regional dialects.

Alright, I’m exhausted. I need breakfast. Investigate these three sites. Wander through them. Read what they say. Try one of their prompts. I shall see you Tuesday for a prompt; Thursday for links; and next Friday for more prompt sites.

If people have a prompt site they like, especially a new one, let me know. I won’t promise they’ll make the list but I would love to check them out.

Happy writing, all.

 
6 Comments

Posted by on 29/08/2014 in exercises, links, poetry

 

Tags: , ,

Poetry Prompts Freeforall: Pick and Choose

7:49 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Rascal Flatts singing These Days

Hello, everyone. This is the final Friday roundup until August, so if you like having one source to check each Friday, rather than having a dozen bookmarked, just bookmark this page and you’ll find your way to each site’s most current prompt. Teachers: you are almost there. Hang on.

lady-holding-a-poem-card-tanzaku-thcasseopia-planetarium-constellation-th

 

 

 

Sepia Saturday, is a site that has been up since 2009! Their thing is photographs, old ones, yours or theirs. This week, long hair: you have to go look! I like this site more and more, partly because they lay out what’s coming up, but mostly because they suggest possibilities with each photograph — themes can be specific or universal. Head over and be sure to read ‘Ask Auntie Miriam’.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda has our fourteen [Yes, fourteen. Deal.] weekly words. I love the source: Today’s words came from a Facebook conversation I had with fellow poet Pamela Kaler Sayers. We both contributed words to this week’s Whirl. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele talks about transport and travel. She gives us a little context in her arriving at the prompt and then her always fabulous guidelines and tips and examples.

There is an art to writing a limerick that transcends the form’s notoriety. We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays, my guaranteed smile of the week — I laughed this week. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for the week’s line.magpie

Over at The Mag [Magpie Tales], Tess gives us quite a challenge. You can stare at the image for quite a while and be overwhelmed by the muchness of it. I notice not many have responded [at The Mag, 32 counts as not many]. Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

At Poetry Jam, Peggy gives us age and aging of more than just people. Visit to see what she says.

carol Carol, at Light Words,is not quite at the dancing on tables stage, but she is back with a rocking prompt. Do you know what a palimpsest is? Whether you do or no, head over to see what she says. I found it fascinating as a possibility for a poem, either as structure or focus.

At the Found Poetry Review we are asked to remix a master remixer, Dylan — or erase.  Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have street naming, pet matchmaking, and underwater. Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, I couldn’t choose between Margaret’s new topic of sketch poems or Isadora’s curse poem. Go look at both. Go play with the toads.

wewritepoemsRed Wolf Poems gives us an image prompt, a painting of the River Walk in my home town, San Antonio. Visit Red Wolf.

The Mid-Week Motif at Poets United, is best friends. Susan has several possible sources of inspiration for us. Head over.

dverseOver at dVerse, Meeting the Bar and Björn introduce the haibun, one of my favourite forms because of its versatility. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place and the ice is clinking.

Flashy Fiction Friday  isn’t up yet, so check a bit later.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post and leave your links with them!

The first summer prompt goes up Tuesday (explanation for newcomers).

OCALHand_WritingHave a wonderful summer (winter). Happy writing, everyone.

Enhanced by Zemanta
 
14 Comments

Posted by on 30/05/2014 in links, poetry

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Poetry Prompts Freeforall: What Do You Mean It’s Friday?

9:02 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Paul Simon singing The Boy in the Bubble

Hello, all. Is it my imagination, or are Fridays coming around with increasing frequency? I thought so. Let’s get to it, then.

lady-holding-a-poem-card-tanzaku-th

 

 

 

casseopia-planetarium-constellation-th

 

 

 

Sepia Saturday, is a site that has been up since 2009! Their thing is photographs, old ones, yours or theirs. If the old photos throw you, read what the prompter suggests for each: There are a host of possible themes you might like to follow ranging from the girls in their room to the pennants and banners on the wall or even that somewhat rudimentary plumbing next to the window — themes can be specific or universal. Head over and be sure to read ‘Ask Auntie Miriam’.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda has our dozen weekly words. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele suggests we take on the unexplained. She gives a list of examples, but that’s in case you haven’t run across unexplained things in your life — what? You haven’t run into a chupacabra? You’ve sussed out crop circles? The tips she includes might work as a structure if started and gone down through. Just saying. If nothing else, stop by and read the example poems. There are some wonderful ones.

Never written a limerick? What are you waiting for? There is an art to writing one that transcends the form’s notoriety. We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays, my guaranteed smile of the week. At the least, go read Madeleine’s limerick for the week’s line.magpie

Over at The Mag [Magpie Tales], Tess gives us an Edward Hopper painting — that got you moving, those who haven’t been over. We do love our Hopper, don’t we? Remember: you do not have to write about the whole image. Sometimes you can write to just one tiny part of the whole. Go on over.

At Poetry Jam, Mary gives us rain, or the lack thereof. Visit to see what she says.

carol Hip replacement happening at Light Words. Hopefully, Carol will be her rocking self soon. I notice that she has begun to look around her and take photographs. Can dancing be far behind? Check to see what she is doing with black and white photos.

At the Found Poetry Review we are asked to remix a master remixer, Dylan — or erase.  Don’t forget to stop by their weekly column highlighting found poetry related news and resources. See what the Review is all about. All things found live there.

Poets & Writers suggestions for all three genres work as possibilities for a poem subject. This week we have top five albums, Sunday drivers, and an abecedarian. Visit.

At imaginary garden with real toads, Kerry discusses the device of the pathetic fallacy in poetry. I found it fascinating. There is a prompt at the end, but read the essay. Go play with the toads.

wewritepoemsRed Wolf Poems has a new giant wordle up. There is something mesmerising about the amount of words and it’s fun to see how many you can incorporate. The source of words are the poems written for the site’s every other weekly prompt.

The Mid-Week Motif at Poets United, is green. Do you know the etymology of ‘green’? Me either, and my reaction on reading what Susan found, was “Well, I’ll be damned’. She has all kinds of possible starting points for us. Head over.

dverseOver at dVerse, Meeting the Bar and ManicDDaily [aka Karen] talk about slant rhyme, something we should all cultivate. Look around while you’re there. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place and the ice is clinking.

It’s character sketch time at Flashy Fiction Friday. Go see what the theme is.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post and leave your links with them!

I shall see you Tuesday for our image prompt; Thursday for the summer calendar; and Friday for the prompt roundup.

OCALHand_WritingHappy writing, everyone.

Enhanced by Zemanta
 
18 Comments

Posted by on 23/05/2014 in links, poetry

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

  • creative commons license

  •