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Prompts Post: Friday Freeforall

9:41 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello, all. I am a trifle late. Bad night. I’m glad to be back amongst the prompt sites. Let us see what we have.

We start with Donna and The Poetry Mixtape, where she tells us: One writer I admire is Hannah Stephenson, who blogs daily at The Storialist. She writes a new poem each day inspired by art that she views on the Internet. (There is a fascinating video of her drafting process here.) I read her blog every day – I am always amazed by her ability not only to draft a poem daily, but to draft well. Donna gives us her favourite poem by Hannah, as well as a couple of suggestions for writing. This week, though, I think the important thing I am taking away is the poem’s theme. Visit.

Joseph Harker’s Reveries says: Obviously I won’t expect you to use Welsh for this prompt (though you are welcome to!), but we are going to try to hold fast to some of those old bardic forms. There is a regimented tradition of literary Welsh which is a beautiful thing; trying to shoehorn it into the English language will not be elegant, but we’re going to try anyway. Go on over to read the whole.

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog has several options revolving around dancelet’s “dance a poem,” she says. Samuel Beckett wrote, “Dance first. Think later. It’s the natural order.” Adele gives us enough ideas to keep us in prompts for weeks.To read all the possibilities, and there are many, visit.

This week on Poetic Bloomings we are invited to Give yourself credit for what you’ve already accomplished, and give yourself permission to aim even higher. To find out more and to read our hosts’ poems, head over.

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda tells us the words were lifted from “Life on Mars,” a television series. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done. As always, we have a fun group of words to work with.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the opening line and title of a song by Merle Haggard. To read the line and for a link to hear Dolly Parton sing the song, head over.

Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact.

Over at Jingle Poetry At The Olive Garden the theme this week is: Spring Break, Vacations, Favorite Colors, First Kiss. Next week will be Boating, Water, Mountains, and Birthday Parties. We seem to have lost the friendly welcoming atmosphere of the old garden. You will find the theme immediately on arriving on site. Then if you scroll down several poems, you will find the next week’s.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. This week’s image is a photograph which made me think of the way we see memories after a while. Head over to see what we have.

Poetry Jam provides us with a prompt from Peggy, this week. She wants us to think about describing an emotion in a tangible way. Go on over to see what else she says.

For you alliterationists out there, visit ABC Wednesday. We meet the link tool, or to be more precise Inlinkz. This is down to the ingenious, intelligent, Aris Korbetus, the name behind INLINKZ…..this week fellow bloggers not only is he writing a piece for our INTRODUCTION – he is also donating a Giveaway Amazon Voucher! Visit. If you win you might be able to buy more books!

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are baffle, elegant, and negate. Remember that it’s all about the three words working together. You might try writing down the first thoughts that come into your head as you read these words, before you go on to visit the site for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given words.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we get two for one visit. First, we have Grace, who has written an article on the tanka form, and given us some lovely examples. The tanka is fun. Head to the Garden to give it a try. We also have A Word With Laurie which discusses perspective and its connection to our writing. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems says, Write a poem that expresses the concept of signs, or uses signs to tell a story. Head on over to read the rest of the prompt, because, you know there is a rest of the prompt at WWP.

At Poets United, we are asked to consider feathers. I don’t know about you, but feathers are one of those things like crayola crayons, blowing bubbles, and shells, the things that make me light up when I see them. For some cool photographs and the rest of the prompt head over.

Over at dVerse’s Meeting the Bar, Charles Miller says, let’s take a poem or part of a poem and put it into the larger context of our lives, like Dante did. Sound interesting? Visit to read the article. It might appear long; okay, it is long, but worth the read. I wanted to be in a room with everyone to discuss it.

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her Weekend Haiku & Limericks gives us the usual three options. Visit for the possibilities and because it’s fun to wander through the site.

The final posting is an offer for those among you who write, or are trying out, flash fiction. I love the photograph Hannah is offering us over at Flashy Fiction, and the post’s title offers another possibility for a direction in which to take the poem.

That should keep you out of the shops and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

Remember: If you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? Again, I thoroughly enjoyed last week’s and this week’s YS@TT. What else have you wanted to ask, or know? If you have an announcement you want posted, send it along for Your Serendipity @ Thursday Thoughts.

I shall see you Tuesday for a prompt on using motifs (and prep work for the following week); Thursday for announcements; and Friday for the next roundup of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

PS I am only partly here, so please forgive anything that doesn’t work. Speaking of not working, WordPress seems to be giving commentors fits, if they are not WordPress users. If anyone knows what’s up, please post in the comments. I’ll look around and see what I can find.

 
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Posted by on 16/03/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Prompts For Us: Friday Freeforall

7:24 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello, all.

We start with Donna and The Poetry Mixtape where she has been having a crazy-busy week. In lieu of her usual, she offers a paragraph by Jane Hirshfield that says in part “Use your failures for paper.’ Meaning, I understood, the backs of failed poems, but also my life,” and a suggestion for what we might try for our own practice. Go on over and check it out, especially those of you who have been exploring prose.

Joseph Harker’s Reveries gives us permission to spend several hours in a coffee shop. Okay, anywhere, but that’s one possibility. He says: But there is another skill, character-building, that poetry can share with prose and other forms of writing as well. Visit Joseph to read the whole prompt. The exercise, like all of his, is important to developing our skills as writers, and it’s fun! Go on over to read the whole.

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog has several intriguing possibilities revolving around dreams… or nightmares. One such is: or you might take on the persona of a dream and write as if you are a dream speaking. I don’t dream and I want to try this one. To read all the possibilities, visit.

This week on Poetic Bloomings we are invited to: Write one more for the road! To find out more, even to read the clever title, and to read our hosts’ poems, head over.

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda tells us the words came from thin air. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done. As always, we have a fun group of words to work with.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the opening line and title of a love poem by Courtney Kuchta. To read the line and for a link to read the poem, head over.

Here comes my first smile of the day: Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact.

Over at Jingle Poetry At The Olive Garden the theme for one more week remains the military, soldiers, veterans, or poetry dealing with physical, mental, and emotional healing. The caretakers of the Garden were supposed to be back. I visited and see signs of life: they are now an olive garden. No new posting yet.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. This week’s image is a photograph. I left it wondering why the young man needs so many paper towels and  whether I can get close enough to read the soup labels. Head over to see what we have.

Poetry Jam provides us with a prompt from Mary, this week. She wants us to write an Anaphora poem. It’s not as scary as it sounds. Most of us do this at some point and some of us love writing this type of poetry. Go on over to see what else she says.

For you alliterationists out there, visit ABC Wednesday. We meet another contributor. I am enjoying meeting the different people who, well, people ABC Wednesday.Head over to meet ‘GiGi’ and this week’s letter.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are crinkle, demand, and navigate. Remember that it’s all about the three words working together. You might try writing down the first thoughts that come into your head as you read these words, before you go on to visit the site for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given words. Crinkle. Love saying that word. Crinkle.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we get two for one visit. It’s Fireblossom Friday, once again, and it’s all about people in uniforms. Head to the Garden to see the photographs. They have a fun collection. We also have the Wednesday Challenge which celebrates, what else, Happy Leap Day… toads, leap… you were there, right?

We Write Poems has invited us to a haibun party! Yay! Head on over to read the rest of the prompt.

At Poets United, we are told, Rebirth is change, growth, but it can mean so much more. For some seriously cool photographs and the rest of the prompt head over.

Over at dVerse’s Poetics, Ami Mattison says I’d like to highlight a few observations about spoken word poetry as an aesthetic style, examine a specific example, and then offer an exercise for writing a successful spoken word poem. The article makes several important points, particularly about point of view. Even if you never plan to read your poetry aloud [I know, but once you start, it’s addictive… still, scary as all get out.], the article is worth a read.

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her Weekend Haiku & Limericks gives us the usual three options… sea cucumbers, anyone? Visit for the other possibilities and because it’s fun to wander through the site.

Oh God, I should not have tried to figure out FF’s photograph. Those with vertigo problems, don’t peer too closely. I’m still clutching my desk. The final posting is an offer for those among you who write, or are trying out, flash fiction. Check the photograph [carefully, carefully] over at Flashy Fiction, and the post’s title offers another possibility for a direction in which to take the poem.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

Remember: If you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? I have thoroughly enjoyed last week’s and this week’s YS@TT. What else have you wanted to ask, or know? If you have an announcement you want posted, send it along for Your Serendipity @ Thursday Thoughts.

Remember that I will be dark for a week. I shall see you Tuesday 13 March for our final prompt on place; Thursday for Part 2 of yesterday’s comments; and Friday for the next roundup of prompts.

San Antonio and little Miss Hazel, here comes Grandma. Happy writing, everyone.

 
9 Comments

Posted by on 02/03/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Prompts R Us: Friday Freeforall

7:34 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello, all. Well! Clearly you were all sitting around and waiting for a can of worms question to be tossed into the crowd. Rather than answer each comment, which would require my stopping life as I know it, for a few days, I think what makes sense is for me to synthesise the comments and report to you in a week. That does not mean you should not go and read the responses, if you have not. A couple of people have gone back to look at other responses and written further. Meanwhile, let’s set up the writing week.

We start with Donna and The Poetry Mixtape where she shares with us the Decemberist song “Red Right Ankle”. We have the lyrics to read and to listen to. I read first and, while I listened, found myself impatient to return to reading the song again [I am highly visual]. I love Meloy’s structure and am excited about trying a poem based on “Red Right Ankle”. Head over to read the lyrics and see what Donna suggests we try.

Joseph Harker’s Reveries sends us on a memento hunt and gives us a process to do so, rather than saying, find ten memories… Joseph reminds us that One of the challenges of poetry is to use your emotional/memory connection to people, places, things, concepts, etc. to articulate the reaction they summon in you — and then to summon it up in other people. Not  an easy task this writer thing. Visit Joseph to read the whole prompt.

The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, challenges us to recall times in our later lives that recalled the childlike wonder of a special “first” or “first times/first experiences”.  To find out more, visit.

This week on Poetic Bloomings we have a photograph and the title of the prompt to give us a start. To find out more and to read our hosts’ poems, head over. Hey, Marie Elena and Walt, can you believe you are bearing down on your site’s one year anniversary?!

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda says, this week’s words were selected at random from your contributions, then I added one more for a baker’s dozen. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done. As always, we have a fun group of words to work with.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the opening line of Auden’s “Funeral Blues”. To read the line and for a link to read, and hear the poem in a clip from Four Weddings and a Funeral, head over.

Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact. I smile as soon as I see the site next on my list.

Over at Jingle Poetry At The Gooseberry Garden the theme for one more week is the military, soldiers, veterans, or poetry dealing with physical, mental, and emotional healing. The caretakers of the Garden are taking a three-week break and suggest that we post at any time during that period. They will return refreshed, March 1st.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. This week’s image invites us to play with colour, if we wish, in addition to the possibility of story. Head over to see what we have.

Poetry Jam provides us with a prompt from Peggy, this week. She asks us to consider the opening stanza of Williams’ “The Red Wheel Barrow” as a jumping off point. Go on over to see what else she says.

For you alliterationists out there, visit ABC Wednesday. The introduction is particularly Funny this week, as we are given the story of Francine and her Frolicking.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are cancel, elastic, and labor. Remember that it’s all about the three words working together. You might try writing down the first thoughts that come into your head as you read these words, before you go on to visit the site for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given words. Reading the definitions allows me to see possibilities and connections.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we get two for one visit. Kenia offers a fascinating Wednesday Challenge which says, Write a poem that keeps a dialogue with another poem, or poet. Head to the Garden to read the rest of the prompt. We also have Mary’s Mixed Bag. Mary offers a strategy that is useful to have in the arsenal when the muse is wandering far afield.

We Write Poems stays with nature but offers a challenge to us: in your descriptive images the challenge is to use terms not the usual or obvious for that subject. Head on over to read the rest of the prompt.

At Poets United, we are asked to consider all the strings in our lives. Think about it, then for the rest of the prompt head over.

Over at dVerse, they want to introduce you to the poet you know as Blue Flute.  He has written an article for us today comparing Japanese and Chinese poetic forms and discussing how these can be adapted into English. The essay is fascinating and the challenge at the end, looks like fun. After all, we all do images, right? Now we are asked to write a connected series. Head to FormForAll to read the essay and the prompt.

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her Weekend Haiku & Limericks gives us seven options, this week. One of the options offered us, is a speaking acquaintance with a tree. Visit for the other six possibilities.

The final posting is an offer for those among you who write, or are trying out, flash fiction. I love the photograph over at Flashy Fiction, and the post’s title offers one possibility for a direction in which to take the poem.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

Remember: If you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? As you saw, this week, if we offer the right ‘niggle’ everyone comes out to play. What have you wanted to ask, or know? If you have an announcement you want posted, send it along for Your Serendipity at Thursday Thoughts.

See you Tuesday for an image prompt on place; next Thursday for a synthesis of yesterday’s comments; and Friday for the next roundup of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 24/02/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Prompts: Friday Freeforall

7:25 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello, all. Yay! Weekend! Yay! Well, Yay! Almost weekend! Yay! does not have quite the same punch. I’m preparing. I’m preparing. Here we go.

We start with Donna and The Poetry Mixtape where she shares with us Katie Ford’s poem “Colosseum”. As Donna says, here is a successful long poem, one that I read and then reread. Very few long poems hold me for one reading. The exercise is fun and can be done in a shorter poem, so don’t feel overwhelmed by the length of Ford’s. Head over to read the poem and see what Donna suggests we try.

Joseph Harker’s Reveries may have some of you shaking your heads, but I promise you, that if you work your way through and give it a try, the exercise is an important and worthwhile one. Joseph asks us to write a poem, as short as possible, using every sound in the language. The post looks intimidating because of the phonetic marks. Ignore them [the linguists out there may revel] and concentrate on the sounds we are asked to reproduce. If you can only manage a few, that’s fine; you will get the idea of what needs to be considered. By the time you read this, we might be into Reverie #6. Go back and try the phonetics, if you haven’t.

I was hoping that dVerse would have their new Poetics prompt up. Alas. Instead, I am sending you to look at their form for this week, which is French Ballades II, a little less cryptic than last week’s FB I, as a clear step by step is offered. The examples, by Dudley Randall and Dorothy Parker, are wonderful.

This week on Poetic Bloomings Marie Elena and Walt ask us to consider the concept old. To find out what they suggest as possibilities, head over to read the full prompt and our hosts’ responses. While there, check in on this week’s form which is a cento, something many of us love tinkering with.

At The Sunday Whirl, this week’s words come from the poem “Kalashnikov Staccato,” by Matthew Kaler. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done. As always, Brenda has picked a fun group of words to work with.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the the first few words of “In the Park,” by John Koethe. To read the line and for a link to read the poem, head over. The line is fun, in the sense that there are several possibilities, to include dividing it at the comma.

Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact. I smile as soon as I see the site next on my list.

Over at Jingle Poetry At The Gooseberry Garden the theme for this week is the military, soldiers, veterans, or poetry dealing with physical, mental, and emotional healing. The caretakers of the Garden are taking a three week break and suggest that we post at any time during that period. They will return refreshed, March 1st.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. They are featuring a grave at the Novodevichy Cemetery, Moscow. If you have not seen the image yet, be ready to jot down your immediate reactions/thoughts. I’m keeping myself in check until this post is finished before I see what else I can find from that cemetery.

Poetry Jam provides us with a prompt from Mary, this week. Between the photographs and her words she had me salivating. Think food and drink, or maybe not. You had better visit to find out what.

For you alliterationists out there, ABC Wednesday presents us with a music video to watch and listen to, Ozzy Osbourne’s Dreamer. For the rest of the alliterative intro, head over.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we have Kerry’s Wednesday Challenge which offers a prompt to do with magical realism. Head over for an explanation and for some interesting illustrations, each of which can be a prompt. I need to go off and study some more to see where this and surrealism bleed into each other.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are control, flesh, and razor. Remember that it’s all about the three words working together. You might try writing down the first thoughts that come into your head as you read these words [creepy are they?], before you go on to visit the site for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given words. Reading the definitions allows me to see possibilities and connections.

We Write Poems asks us to look at our hands, more specifically, Hands are a place where fingers take bloom. That’s such a lovely image. Visit to read the rest of the prompt. You might, during one day, list every thing you do requiring fingers. Uh huh. I think the only reason we sleep is so fingers can.

At Poets United, we have no Thursday Think Tank this week. Instead I shall link you to their night owl prompt, as you can post anytime during the week. The Midnight Snack is a photograph. There’s something about it… Visit and see.

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her Weekend Haiku & Limericks has the usual three options. Despite needing to get this post written and out, I always find myself checking the links for the three options. It might be fun to connect the three in a poem. This week’s seem to go together particularly well. The photograph of the flower, as always, is stunning.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

Remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? What have you wanted to ask, or know? If you have an announcement you want posted, send it along for Your Serendipity at Thursday Thoughts.

See you Tuesday for a prompt [not mysterious; undecided at this moment]; next Thursday for announcements; and Friday for the next roundup of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 10/02/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Prompts Scrimmage: Friday Freeforall

8:32 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello, all. Welcome to the new people following and those who have wandered by. A note about the sites below. I have them in chronological order, starting with Saturday, so if you want to be in with the rest of the scrum, you’ll need to write and post quickly. On the other hand, if you find a prompt you like and are slow like I, you can post later, or have the satisfaction of knowing you have another poem to add to your repertoire. Let us begin.

We start with Donna and The Poetry Mixtape where she says of this week’s  poem: This is one of my favorite poems of the past few years partly because something about it remains just out of reach. I loved the poem the minute I read it and the prompt offers a couple of different possibilities that follow the idea of the poem, rather than its content. Head over to read the poem and see what the possibilities are.

Joseph Harker’s Reveries offers us another way of approaching our writing: we’re going to grow a poem instead of shaping it. He uses the tree as his analogy and takes us through the steps. And, they work. At least, they work for me and the others who have posted, so if you have been feeling leery about this method, give it a try. It does not have to become the method by which you write poetry, but it can become another way to approach how you write a poem when you have an idea, but aren’t sure how to go about it. Visit to read the details and give it a try.

Did you know there is a Martian school of poetry? Neither did I. It’s an enchanting thought. Head to the bar at dVerse, to learn more. Then, you can try your hand at martian poetry.

This week on Poetic Bloomings Marie Elena and Walt ask us to: develop a personal motto. To find out what to do with your motto, head over to read the full prompt and our hosts’ responses. While there, check in on this week’s interview with Jane Penland Hoover, writer and photographer.

At The Sunday Whirl, this week’s words come from the poem “One Day You Wake Up,” by Ann Hunkins. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done. There are many fresh and original uses of some of the words.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the the last six words of Margaret Mitchell’s Gone With the Wind. To read the line and for a link to read a snippet on Mitchell, head over.

I smile as soon as I see the site next on my list. Now, having just read Madeleine’s limerick, I am grinning. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact.

Over at Jingle Poetry At The Gooseberry Garden the theme for this week is no theme! Next week has a fairly wide open theme: the military, soldiers, veterans, or poetry dealing with physical, mental, and emotional healing.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. They are featuring a Kandinsky painting. Don’t be put off by the abstractness of it. Look over it as you would any other image and jot notes about what you see. Exactly what is there? Then, what might be there? You can also ignore the painting and respond to the title.

Poetry Jam provides us with a prompt from Peggy, this week. She offers a prompt to do with a specific sensory feeling. This particular sensory feeling can be literal, metaphorical, and symbolic, so we are given a wide scope in which to play.

For you alliterationists out there, ABC Wednesday introduces us to another contributor who asks us to, Come and gather your Cs. For the rest of her alliterative intro, head over.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we get two possibilities with one visit. Ella’s Edge on Tuesday offers a prompt to do with the movies. Buy a ticket and find out what. It is Fireblossom Friday and we are invited to play. Are you tempted? Go on over and enjoy the prompt, which comes with illustrations for those of us who need a little visual push with this topic.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are detach, jolt, and surge. Remember that it’s all about the three words working together. You might try writing down the first thoughts that come into your head as you read these words, before you go on to visit the site for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given words. Reading the definitions allows me to see possibilities and connections.

We Write Poems features a prompt from Donald Harbour that he starts with: I have the foolish dream that one day there will be no… To find out what, head on over. You will also find a link to Donald’s blog and the original post, if you don’t already have him on speed dial. Visit Donald’s blog to see his header photograph, if for no other reason. It made my day, when I first saw it.

At Poets United, it’s time for Ella’s photo prompt. Say YES. And, go visit. Also, stop by for this week’s interview with Heaven [I kid you not].

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her Weekend Haiku & Limericks has the usual three options. Despite needing to get this post written and out, I always find myself checking the links for the three options. It might be fun to connect the three in a poem. This week, among other things, we have PeopleTowels… I promise you I stopped writing this and went to check it out.

And, one announcement from Julie Catherine, which is time sensitive. She says: “I interviewed James Hutchings, who writes Dark Fantasy poems and short stories; plus I reviewed his book, The New Death and Others, and would like to give him some exposure.” If you are curious investigate the links. I have been to James’ blog and he has a wide range of interests.

And, if you haven’t seen my interview with poet James Brush, why, go there first!

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

Remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? What have you wanted to ask, or know? If you have an announcement you want posted, send it along for Your Serendipity at Thursday Thoughts.

See you Tuesday for another place prompt — we’ll be looking at a poem; next Thursday for announcements; and Friday for the next roundup of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
11 Comments

Posted by on 03/02/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Prompts Scrum: Friday Freeforall

8:18 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello, all, and a Happy Australia Day. Plus, the weekend approacheth, so let’s go.

Let us start with Donna and visit The Poetry Mixtape where she discusses the poetry of song lyrics, through Simon and Garfunkel’s The Boxer. She suggests we: Try taking some of your favorite song lyrics and relining them as poems. To read her post and example head over. I can tell you, now, that it’s a lot of fun and might be used as a step off for a found poem, or an erasure poem.

Joseph Harker’s Reveries takes us into the land of symbols where he encourages us to frolic. There is, in Joseph.’s words, a first part, a tricky part, a trickier part, and an added challenge. Visit to read about symbolism and what he suggests we do to stretch that writing muscle and to read the responses of the people who have been frolicking already.

Over at dVerse, we are asked: For this week’s Poetics, let’s cross some borders with our pens. The lead-up to this is an interesting discussion of borders and when I think of how full of borders my life is, I find a wealth of material to write about, using borders as a start point. Head over to dVerse and try not to get lost in the ballade form waiting in another room.

This week on Poetic Bloomings Marie Elena and Walt ask us to: Colour My World (and we don’t even care if you stay within the lines!). Head over to read the full prompt and our hosts responses.

At The Sunday Whirl, this week’s words come from Alice Hoffman’s book, The Story Sisters. Visit to see the wordle [40, Brenda!] and to read what others have done. Go crush those ashen sisters and scatter their shards…whoops, sorry, I didn’t manage to come up with a poem. My brain picked this out while I was looking at the wordle, just now.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the title of a musical soliloquy by Peggy Lee. To read the line and for a link to hear Lee sing the song, head over. I stopped for a moment to listen. Lordy, what a warm and lovely voice.

I smile as soon as I see the site next on my list. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy. It doesn’t much matter if you don’t want to write a limerick; reading them brightens a day. Fact.

Over at Jingle Poetry At The Gooseberry Garden the theme for this week is to try a headline poem. They provide links and images from several New York Times articles. Looking towards next week: no theme! A freeforall, you might say.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. LOVE the image. At first I was startled, then amused, then intrigued. I have left the site; the image has not left my mind.

Poetry Jam, provides us with a prompt from Dani, this week. She talks about sensual poetry and, as sensory imagery is vital to a poet, it is vital you visit. Were you aware there are other senses? Several other senses? Me either. But it makes sense and opens up sensory imagery to even more possibilities.

For you alliterationists out there, ABC Wednesday is doing something new with their introductions: they are introducing their contributors with a mini-interview. This week is Berowne, whom some of you will have stumbled across in our cybering world. I gave you a link to his blog because he uses many of the prompt sites we do, in a completely different way. Visit him, if you haven’t. Your submission does not have to be written. You can submit a photograph or illustration that fits the letter of the week.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we get two possibilities with one visit. On Wednesday Kenia introduces us to Turkish poet Nâzım Hikmet. Then, she asks us to write a futuristic poem. Sounds like fun and different, so go over and read what it’s about. Mary’s prompt for Friday not only asks us to try a conversation poem, but gives wonderful examples. Even if you don’t think conversation is your thing [you might be surprised — there are so many ways of approaching it], visit to read the Naomi Shihab Nye poems, especially the second one. Tidbit: When someone recognizes you in a grocery store/nod briefly and become a cabbage. I know!

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are bubble, lumber, and wreck. Remember that it’s all about the three words working together. Reading the definitions allows me to see possibilities and connections. Visit the site for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given words.

We Write Poems titles their prompt, Kissing the Ceiling. I figure that’s enough to get everyone to visit.

At Poets United, our focus is roads. Where to start? Think about it. Roads is huge. For now head over and read the prompt and look at the gorgeous photographs. Oh, and while you are there you can read this week’s interview, if you aren’t up to your eyebrows in things you know about me.

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her Weekend Haiku & Limericks has the usual three options. Despite needing to get this post written and out, I always find myself checking the links for the three options. It might be fun to connect the three in a poem. This week, among other things, we have e-stewards

That should keep you off the streets, busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

Remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? What have you wanted to ask, or know? If you have an announcement you want posted, send it along for Your Serendipity at Thursday Thoughts.

See you Tuesday for an image prompt; next Thursday for an interview with poet, James Brush, if we get it done in time — if not, we have announcements; and Friday for the next roundup of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 27/01/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Prompts for Your Delectation: Friday Freeforall

8:40 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello all. Yes, a little late this morning. I was ordering a car seat for my soon to be born, first grandchild and got distracted by baby toys.

Let us start with Donna and visit The Poetry Mixtape where she talks about a Frost poem, this week. The accompanying suggestion is to try a sonnet, but along nontraditional lines, to break the sonnet into stanzas, as Frost has done, and a couple of other suggestions that you will have to visit to read. For those of you, like me, who are buffaloed by the sonnet as a form, this is one way to make your mind think it’s writing something else.

Joseph Harker’s Reveries gives us a fun technique to play with, this week: climbing rhymes. I had more darn fun with this, and I feel like I moved a whole step up with my writing. Is it easy? No, but worth the struggle. I made the comment to Pamela that: I think we need to treat Joseph’s prompts like a creative writing classroom, where what we post might be a first draft, or only half the exercise, and talk about our processes more fully. I am going to try that with the next prompt, if I have difficulty. I should have done it with the last one, which I could only do part of. If we have difficulty and post and talk about our difficulties, we can help each other. Make sense?

Over at dVerse, we are given a posting on imagism, something every one of us needs to take heed of. Visit to read the discussion of this style, in particular, Ezra Pound’s description of it. Then, try your own imagist poem.

This week on Poetic Bloomings Marie Elena and Walt ask us to: Take an eye-catching line from one of the poems posted ahead of you at Poetic Bloomings.  Although the prompt changes tomorrow, it is always fun to craft a poem using someone else’s lines, so do it, and visit to see what others have done, as well as reading the hosts’ offerings.

At The Sunday Whirl this week’s words and wordle appearance come from Barbara Yates Young. She gives us a baker’s dozen from Thoreau’s Walden, the “Pond in Winter” chapter. Visit to see the wordle and to read  what others have done.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the opening line of a Beckett novel. We can wax quite philosophical with this one…or go existential. To read the line and for a link to read some of Beckett’s one liners, head on over. He must have been fun at a party.

Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. I smile as soon as I see the site as next on my list. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy.

Over at Jingle Poetry At The Gooseberry Garden the theme for this week is Spring, Colors, Trees, and New Lives. Looking towards next week, they will be asking us to try a headline poem, something which is great fun. Head over to read Kay’s instructions.  You might also visit their form this week, as it is quite an intriguing exercise.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. LOVE the image. Compelling. And, it’s not just the expression on the sculpture’s face, but the fact there are other sculptures around her. Cryptic? Why, yes. Go visit.

Poetry Jam, provides us with a prompt from Mary, this week. Her theme is You Can Go Home Again. For her discussion of the theme, head over. For a reason I know not, the link takes us to the bottom of the comments, so scroll up. For those Blogger owners who have been having problems with receiving comments, you will find a suggestion of what you can do at the end of Mary’s post.

For you alliterationists out there, ABC Wednesday starts its 10th round. We have so many photographers and artists among the poets, that when I noticed something about the ABC Wednesday I had not noticed before, I wanted to tell you: The submission does not have to be written. You can submit a photograph or illustration that fits the letter of the week. Sounds like a fun alternative.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we get two possibilities with one visit. On Wednesday Grace offers the chance to learn a new form and, maybe, to save it from extinction. Visit and learn about the tanaga. Several people have posted, so you will have examples to study. The prompt for Friday gives us a chance to let loose of seriousness and indulge in nonsense. If you head over, you will see that Laurie had entirely too much fun with this post, while offering us a wealth of nonsensical possibilities.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are downhill, freak, and sliver. Remember that it’s all about the three words working together. Reading the definitions allowed me to see fascinating possibilities and connections. Visit the site for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given words.

We Write Poems offers us a prompt from Gautami Tripathy, who suggests another approach to writing about memories. Head over to read the prompt.

At Poets United, we are told: Goodbye! To see the illustrations and read the rest of the prompt, visit.

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her Weekend Haiku & Limericks has the usual three options. Despite needing to get this post written and out, I always find myself checking the links for the three options. It might be fun to connect the three in a poem. And, if not a poem, how can one not wander through a site that features: aging parents, tiny frogs, sledding crows. I mean, can you? This is one of the few Blogger blogs I have visited today, that does not leap immediately to the comments section.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

Remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? What have you wanted to ask, or know? If you have an announcement you want posted, send it along for Your Serendipity at Thursday Thoughts.

See you Tuesday for Place; next Thursday for announcements; and Friday for the next roundup of prompts.

Blogger: Get your act together.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
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Posted by on 20/01/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Prompts: Friday the Thirteenth Freeforall

8:00 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello all. I have no faith that this post will get through in one piece. You will recall, those who are subscribed, that a rogue post appeared in your boxes yesterday. Today my keyboard refuses to work. I called my husband who gave me directions [you should see his closet] to a USB keyboard in his closet. It’s working…for now. However, a window randomly opened as I typed this, so no promises. You  will get this in some form, though.

Let us start with Donna and visit The Poetry Mixtape where she says: Write a poem that breaks the rules of grammar and mechanics. Well, after that kind of statement, you have to go read the rest of the post, which involves a discussion of a cummings’ poem [what? you thought there was someone else?].

We have a newcomer in this spot: Joseph Harker’s Reveries. Syn(aes)thetic gems is the focus of the first reverie. For those who revel in metaphor, you will revel in this. For those who find difficulty with metaphor, as I do, the exercise is worth doing for as far as you can go. You might surprise yourself. Head over and read the first reverie in the series and read what others have done. Joseph will be changing the prompts Saturday-ish.

Over at dVerse, we are given a posting on onomatopoeia. Sound in a poem is a rich sensory image that we tend not to use as often as we should, and this type of sound is even less used. The prompt asks us to write a poem using at least one onomatopoeic sound.  dVerse also provides a link for a great list of onomatopoeia. Visit to read the discussion of this technique.

This week on Poetic Bloomings Marie Elena and Walt provide us with a photo prompt.  It’s an interesting image, as they have chosen a photo that focuses more on colours than anything else, so allows us more scope for a response. Head over to see the photograph and the hosts’ offerings.

At The Sunday Whirl this week’s stumper was ‘thatched’ but the creativity with which many of you are using the word is inspiring. Brenda ‘found’ the words in a poem by Vietnamese poet Thich Nhat Hanh. Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read  what others have done.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the first line of a Frank Sinatra song. To read the line and for a link to hear the song, head on over.

Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. I smile as soon as I see the site as next on my list. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy.

Over at Jingle Poetry At The Gooseberry Garden the theme for this week is Children’s Stories, Riddles, Counting Songs, and Rhyming Lyrics for Young Kids. Looking towards next week, they will be asking us to focus on Spring, Colors, Trees, and New Lives.  The garden has a lovely new look, so visit.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. LOVE the photograph. I spent quite a bit of time staring at it. So much is going on, that if you had an instant response and wrote a poem, it’s worth going back, starting at one of the corners, going over the image like a detective looking for a cigarette butt, and jotting notes as you go. I notice the site has changed its name. In the hopes that magpies are still associated and that they don’t know about me, I will continue to refer to them by the name with which we are familiar [okay, until they ask me to make the change].

Our second new entrant, Poetry Jam, is a site kept by four people, providing us with prompts which vary according to each person’s style. This week we have Chris, who has provided us with a photograph to which we are asked to respond. I love Chris’ haiku response. For a reason I know not, the link takes us to the bottom of the comments, so scroll up.

For you alliterationists out there, ABC Wednesday asks whether any of us would like to introduce one of the 26 letters in the next round. If you think it would be fun to alliterate like mad, a certain letter, visit and let them know. Otherwise, the last letter of this round is Z. Try that one.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we get two possibilities with one visit. On Wednesday the prompt starts with a fascinating discussion of clichés and the origin of the word. Naturally, the prompt has to do with writing a poem about a clichéd topic, without it being clichéd. Head over to find out what the topic is and to read about clichés. The prompt for Friday is unclear, but if you like Tom Waits, visit. You can make up your own prompt to do with him, or the colour green [I apologise if the prompt is there and I missed it].

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are brutal, sullen, and trust. Remember that it’s all about the three words working together. Visit the site for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given words.

We Write Poems tells us what the prompt is not: So this prompt is not about climbing a mountain, or why this was one response to that great and tragic war, not about those sorts of details. Head over to read the rest of the prompt and find out what the prompt is. It is quite a challenge.

At Poets United, we are told: You’ve chosen to read today’s prompt so now the choice is yours to write or not write for it. Combatant? Belligerent? Not at all. Go over to read the prompt and look at the photographs [themselves each a prompt]. I would kill, okay maybe hurt someone a little, for one of those doughnuts.

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her Weekend Haiku & Limericks has the usual three options. Despite needing to get this post written and out, I always find myself checking the links for the three options. It might be fun to connect the three in a poem. And, if not a poem, how can one not wander through a site that features: Clawed, cats and/or ships, Washed Ashore, beach cleanup, gyres.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

And, remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? What have you wanted to ask, or know? If you have an announcement you want posted, send it along and it will go into the Thursday Thoughts pile.

See you Tuesday for the things we don’t say; next Thursday for announcements; and Friday for the next roundup of prompts. Okay, spelling checked, links checked, categories, tags, title…hold my breath.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 13/01/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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First Prompt Roundup 2012: The Friday Freeforall

7:25 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello everyone. A couple of notes to add to yesterday’s post about the content of future Thursday Thoughts. Oh, and if you are a walker by rather than a subscriber, and don’t know about yesterday’s post, you might stop by and give it a look.

ViV and Pamela were back quickly with announcements for next week and I realised I had not talked about how you might get announcements to me. You may, as they did, put the announcements in the comments, or, you can email me at: margoroby[at]gmail.com. If any of the announcements are time sensitive, let me know, as, if I receive many items, I might divide them up.

Now for the roundup. Hi, all you prompt sites! I have missed visiting you.

Let us start with Donna (Yay!), who has a new format for her Saturday posts. Visit The Poetry Mixtape where she tells us: Each week, I will share a poem that has held special meaning for me or taught me something about writing or the world. After a brief explanation and the poem text (or link to text), I may offer a question or point to consider for writing your own poem. Visit to read the post and the first of the poems Donna will share with us.

Over at dVerse, they offer something a little different this week: We have no Mr. Linky, but an apportunity to submit your poem and possibly have it featured in the February issue of M:/P MAG. Race over and read the rest of the post. There is a time crunch.

This week on Poetic Bloomings Marie Elena and Walt suggest we consider ends before we get stuck into beginnings.  Head over to read the prompt and the hosts’ offerings. I’m still shaking my head over Walt’s. And, I’m laughing.

AtThe Sunday Whirl we battled plums this week. Marianne from *elle ecrit* provided this week’s wordle words. She lifted them from Barabara Crooker’s poem, The Meteorology of Loss. Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read  what others have done.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the first line of Elinor Wylie’s poem ‘The Church Bell’. To read the line and for a link to the poem, head on over. If you haven’t read Wylie, do. And, stick with the poem. Wylie’s work has twists.

Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. I smile as soon as I see the site as next on my list. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy.

Over at Jingle Poetry At The Gooseberry Garden the theme for this week is a clean slate/new beginnings.  And looking towards next week, they will be asking us to focus on Children’s Stories, Riddles, Counting Songs, and Rhyming Lyrics for Young Kids.  The garden has a lovely new look, so visit. I’m just happy that jingle is back in the title!

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. The scene is quite idyllic. Visit even if you don’t usually write from an image, and look at the painting for a moment. Why? Because it’s lovely, and because we will be looking at idyllic poetry on Tuesday.

For you alliterationists out there, ABC Wednesday asks: And will YOU be saying YES to ABC Wednesday, Round 10 this YEAR? Visit to read the rest of the introduction and also to follow links to a couple of Y songs.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we get two possibilities with one visit. On Wednesday the prompt says: I do love the idea of taking objects and renaming them, symbols to use in writing a poem. I thought this could add another element to our poetry. The prompt for Friday asks Ever have a day when you weren’t quite yourself, or maybe you felt like more than your usual self? Head to the site to read more on both prompts [I am having to speak sternly to myself to finish this post, before racing off to try the Wednesday prompt.], as well as to explore, if you have not visited before.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are naughty, tactic, and zenith. That looks tough, but the ideas often spark when looking at the three definitions together. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given word.

We Write Poems asks: Tell us about what things a person can do as a member of a group or community. Head over to read the rest of the prompt while thinking of all the different sorts of communities you belong to.

At Poets United, it is time for Ella Wilson’s Reflection Photo. Given our focus on the Surreal, this week at Tuesday Tryouts, I found the shell intriguing, and surreal.

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her Weekend Haiku & Limericks has the usual three options. Despite needing to get this post written and out, I always find myself checking the links for the three options. It might be fun to connect the three in a poem.

Elizabeth Crawford is taking some time off, so you will no longer see her anchoring this post.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

And, remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? What have you wanted to ask, or know? If you have an announcement you want posted, send it along and it will go into the Thursday Thoughts pile.

See you Tuesday for a look at the idyllic; next Thursday for the first of the community announcements; and Friday for the next roundup of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 06/01/2012 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Last Prompt Roundup of 2011: The Friday Freeforall

7:25 a.m. — Atlanta

Hello everyone. Are you shopped, wrapped, candled, decorated, eggnogged, and all the other things that go into the next couple of weeks? I haven’t even packed and I leave far too early tomorrow morning. But, first, my second cup of coffee.

Let us start with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck where she says: There are patterns everywhere in nature. And, there are. Scientists have discovered that nothing is without pattern, including chaos [mathematicians, of course, have always known this.]. Yes, you will need to visit to find out what the options are. Two more tow-trucks.

Over at dVerse, in a bit of synchronicity, the prompt revolves around quilts and quilting. Can anyone say patterns? Head over for the article on quilts and to read the options for writing a poem.

This week on Poetic Bloomings Marie Elena and Walt ask us to look at preparation and being prepared, especially given the time of year. Head over to read the prompt and the hosts’ offerings. You can also enjoy the poinsettias in their header, if you have not yet bought yours.

AtThe Sunday Whirl Brenda gives us words chosen from Billy Collins’ poem ‘Christmas Sparrow’. Visit to see Brenda’s wordle and to read  what others have done. She provides a link, so that we can read the poem. I had forgotten how lovely it is.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the first line of a poem by Robert H Smith entitled ‘The Clock of Life’. To read the line and for a link to the poem, head on over.

It looks like Susan May James might be back with us and she has a novel idea for a series of prompts revolving around sound. Visit Scribble & Scatter to read the prompt [I wanted to stop writing this and try the exercise she gives in addition to the sound clip] and what she proposes to do.

My guaranteed weekly smile. I even smile when I read my opening sentence. I hope Madeleine never becomes tired of writing these. Whether you like to read them or want to try writing one, this site is the place to play with limericks. I smile as soon as I see the site as next on my list. Go to Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for her Limerick-off Mondays and a lot more besides. Go for the laugh. It’s healthy.

Over at The Gooseberry Garden the theme for this week is PhotosNostalgia, Memories, and Families.  And looking towards next week, they will be asking us to focus on Snow, December, Winter Vacations, and Wildness.  Down here in Atlanta where it will reach 70 degrees today, we’re not feeling the winter so much.

Visit Magpie Tales for our image prompt. The painting is a little weird, but that allows us to be a little weird with our responses. Or, we can ignore the weird and focus on other aspects. But, the weird is hard to resist, if only to see how to deal with it.

For you alliterationists out there, ABC Wednesday offers a short introduction to Vancouver. Head over to read and to take up the torch for V.

Over at imaginary garden with real toads we get two possibilities with one visit. On Wednesday the prompt revolves around the epistolary form and choosing a character or characters from literary history. The prompt for Friday asks to use the ideas and images in Ron Sexsmith’s “Strawberry Blonde” as jumping-off points. Head to the site to read more on both prompts and to hear the song, as well as to explore, if you have not visited before.

The three words this week for Three Word Wednesday are immobile, proximity, and retribution. That looks tough, but the ideas often spark when looking at the three definitions together. As always, visit them for their definitions. They have a particularly good source and I often get ideas from the definitions rather than the given word.

We Write Poems Window faces. That’s it. Yes, I know that was last week’s prompt. Head over to read why it’s here again.

At Poets United, Robb says: We look forward to reading your off the cuff poetic exploration. What can he mean? You will have to visit to find out, but the exercise is interesting, and yes, I did it.

Over at Patricia K. Lichen, Author her Weekend Haiku & Limericks has no new posting, so she may have gone dark for a few days. If you haven’t visited the site and wandered around, do. It’s quite lovely.

And, finally, stop by and add your voice to Elizabeth Crawford’s discussion site Writers Speak  where she asks writers of all genres to stop by and talk about the life of a writer. She posts new topics every week around Friday. This week Elizabeth invites us to play. If unscrambling words is your forte, or just something you love to try, go on over. We don’t get many chances to talk to each other about our craft. Here’s a chance. If you haven’t gone over, go, before Elizabeth changes the topic! Even then, there is no reason you can’t contribute to a past discussion.

If you have not been over to look at Joseph’s and Tessa’s first issue of Curio, do. It’s a gem of an issue and maybe you will be inspired to submit.

That should keep you busy and writing. If you think anyone else would enjoy these, click on the buttons below. If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post! And, remember: if you have a topic you want me to discuss, tell me. I’ll take on just about anything and if it’s beyond me, I’ll find sources. What niggles? What have you wanted to ask, or know?

Wordgathering is going dark for two weeks, while I am celebrating Christmas with family, out in California. I shall see you for the first Tuesday Tryouts of the new year, on the 3rd of January; and the following Friday for the first Friday Freeforall roundup of prompts.

Happy writing and happy whichever holiday you celebrate, everyone. Stay safe.

 
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Posted by on 16/12/2011 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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