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Poetry Freeforall: On the Menu

7:21 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to At the Zoo sung by Simon & Garfunkel

Hullo, all. Thank you for your good wishes for my vacation. Nine days ’til we take off. We already have a reservation at a lovely, little restaurant in Lafayette, Louisiana, where we’ll stop overnight on our way to San Antonio. I learned from my parents to map travel routes by restaurants. Let’s get into our own food for the soul.

tow-truck1Donna’s parking place.

 

At Naming Constellations Joseph Harker refines his own poem, a circumstance that must have felt a little weird, at times. However, if we can learn to look at and refine our own work like he can, even to a degree, we would learn so much about our own writing. He includes a prompt to do with sound. Give it a go, even if you, like I, run for the hills when words like dactylic are thrown around (actually I was taught all the meters as a child, but don’t have an ear for it when writing).

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele asks what is our favourite childhood book. Well! I stopped for several minutes to ruminate and reminisce. What fun! My mother kept every single one of my childhood books and sent several boxes to me, a few years ago. I love seeing them on the bookshelves. Go on over to see what she suggests we write about.

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda has a lovely selection of words. I even wrote a poem. No, I didn’t quite get to posting it. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have the new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

Over at Carry On Tuesday,  Keith has given us a line from The Sound of Music. It encourages a list poem. Head over.

Whoa! I found myself, a moment ago, with notebook in hand, writing a first line. It must be summer. We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Madeleine always writes a limerick, as an example. Look around while you are there. I visit because I know I will laugh and laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write.

Visit The Mag [Magpie Tales] for our first image prompt. This week we have a painting, Waking, Walking, Singing, in the Next Dimension? by Morris Graves. I found myself wanting to stop and write immediately. Many possibilities with this one. Remember that you do not have to address the whole image, or its subject. What was the first thought through your mind when you saw the image? Grab it. Write.

Laurie Kolp, at Poetry Jam, talks about vacations, and she has added a twist. Go on over and see what she says and to see her photographs.

This week on Carol’s Light Words she has given us some gorgeous photos of flowers and asks a great question, What is the scent of summer?. Don’t forget that Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember that she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

At imaginary garden with real toads, I can’t choose. I want you to check out both Hardcore Americana and Kerry’s Challenge, so get over there. Investigate. I promise, you have never heard Amazing Grace sung like this. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems is on the seventh of ten poems asking us to focus on a protagonist. This week, your protagonist is  metamorphosing. Head over to read the context and suggestions.

At dVerse, Charles Miller says, Take out the scissors!  He focuses on the cut-up as a form. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. For those who haven’t seen the cut-up machine, can you say: cyber-scissors, baby!

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday, for a profile poem and Friday for the round-up of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone. (Why do you suppose all my links are grey instead of their usual bright red? Sigh… yeh, I’ll go up and add a text colour. I just want to know why!)

 
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Posted by on 07/06/2013 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall: Push the Envelope

8:22 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to East of Ginger Trees sung by Seals & Crofts

Hullo, all. We’re moving too fast, people. I wish I knew a way to slow it all down. One way, is to visit each site — wild, huh? Or, choose one you don’t usually go to, with the firm determination of writing a poem to its prompt. If you usually avoid, say, images, then make sure you try an image prompt. If you have not written a limerick… well? What are you waiting for? Did you know you can write a story poem through limericks? Check out Madeleine’s composition down in comments here.

tow-truck1Donna’s parking place.

 

 

At Naming Constellations Joseph Harker reviews Lesley Wheeler’s The Receptionist and Other Tales. No, not a prompt, but a good idea. Even if we don’t get around to reading chapbooks, we can learn a lot from a good review, and you know our Joseph. He says, in part, with tongue firmly planted in cheek: there is an equal mix of everywoman sensibility, nuanced university politics, and a rich literary allusiveness. Sounds intriguing, no? So head on over to read the full review.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, she suggests we try writing transformation poems, that is, poems in which something becomes something else. Her suggestions were eye-opening. I hadn’t thought of transformation in such a wide sense. Plenty of scope for poems. Visit to discover for yourself.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, Brenda says My daughter and I constructed this list. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have the new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

Over at Carry On Tuesday,  Keith has given us the opening line from the 1949 movie Adam’s Rib. As a challenge, the phrase is in French. His extra is a trailer from the movie. Go on over.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Madeleine always writes a limerick, as an example. Look around while you are there. I visit because I know I will laugh and laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write.

Visit The Mag [Magpie Tales] for our first image prompt. This week we have an image by Last Exit which leaves it all to our imagination, if we ignore the title, Ponytail. Remember that you do not have to address the whole image, or its subject. What was the first thought that went through your mind when you saw the image? Grab it. Write.

Alan1704, at Poetry Jam, talks about goodbyes, the good and the bad. Go on over and see what he says.

This week on Carol’s Light Words I have given you the general URL, as I see several images that might spark a poem. Don’t forget that Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember that she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

It seems I was just wondering what Hannah would be giving us next and here she is with the answer. At imaginary garden with real toads, Hannah promises us 22 weeks of magical, natural wonders. Visit. Investigate. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems is asking us to focus on a protagonist for a few weeks. This week, your protagonist is going somewhere… odd. The post is titled Wizard of Oz Revisited. Head over to read the context and suggestions.

At dVerse, Victoria takes us through synesthesia. The main thrust of my summer prompts are sensory exercises, so give this one a go. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Lemonade coming up.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday, for the summer calendar and first summer prompt; and Friday for the round-up of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 31/05/2013 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall: Visit. Write. Post.

8:51 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Lee Greenwood singing Mornin’ Ride

Hullo, all. Summer is a-comin’, although our temperature has taken a nose-dive, today. Atlanta is like that. Let’s go for a prompt walk.

tow-truck1We start with Donna. It occurs to me that most of you are looking for prompts that you can write, then post. Giving you prompts from last year doesn’t hack it. I’m not a superstitious person, but Donna has started my Friday postings from day 1. For now, I am going to leave the old tow truck image as my start. I can’t quite bear not to start with Donna.

At The Refinery Joseph takes on a poem by Guy Traiber. I am amazed every time he presents us with his refining of a poem, how much I learn. Don’t forget to keep sending your poems in to Joseph, so he has a stockpile. Joseph also gives us a prompt where he asks us to, Write a poem that combines your everyday life with those images. What images? Head over to find out. You’ll like the prompt.

adele kennyAt The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, I had to laugh. She asks us for a portrait poem. Just a few days ago, I finished putting together my summer menu for your Tuesday prompts. One of the weeks asks for a portrait poem. Now I’ll just link to Adele!  [No, you may not link to your poem, if you write one. I want new, new, new.] Head over for her tips, her suggestions, and her example poems.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, the words come from a poem by Margaret Atwood: ‘Helen of Troy Does Countertop Dancing’. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have the new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

Over at Carry On Tuesday,  Keith has given us a song title from Cy Coleman and Carolyn Leigh. You might want to wait until you have written your poem before listening to, or reading the lyrics of, the song. Keith has given us a Frank Sinatra recording for our listening pleasure. Go on over.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Madeleine always writes a limerick, as an example. Look around while you are there. After a year and a half of posting this link, I still smile as soon as I come to it on my list. I visit because I know I will laugh and laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write.

Visit The Mag [Magpie Tales] for our first image prompt. This week we have a painting by Jamie Wyeth. Remember that you do not have to address the whole image, or its subject. Find some small detail that sparks you and write about that. You can even riff off the title.

Peggy, at Poetry Jam, wants to know about shoes. What about them, you ask. Go on over and find out.

This week on Carol’s Light Words she gives us a lovely photograph to spark a poem. Don’t forget that Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember that she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

At imaginary garden with real toads, it is Fireblossom Friday and a prompt to do with setting, something many of you are partial to. Head over to look at the wonderful photographs you might use as inspiration. Visit. Investigate. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems is asking us to focus on a protagonist for a few weeks. This week, your protagonist is Playing Sherlock. Head over to read the context and suggestions.

At dVerse, Samuel Peralta gives us a complex but fun form, the glosa. Samuel is particularly good at taking people through a form, so give it a try. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday, for an  image prompt; Thursday for links and such; and Friday for the round-up of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
7 Comments

Posted by on 24/05/2013 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall: Get ‘Em While They’re Hot

7:26 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Mumford & Sons singing I Will Wait… you’ll need to wait a moment. I can’t do anything and listen to the lead singer.

Hullo, all. Ready for the weekend? I thought so. Here are some prompts to accompany you.

We start with Donna’s Put Words Together. Make Meaning and a dip into the Tow Truck archives. We are asked to use the work of other writers for our own purposes.  This time, choose a rhyming couplet from any poem by another author. To find out what you are going to do with the couplet, head to the Tow Truck.

Aaaand, he’s back, ladies and gentlemen. The Refinery is open once more for your viewing pleasure. Not only can you watch a master class in taking a poem apart and discussing how it works, but Joseph adds a prompt to do with relationships and celestial bodies. You all have your metaphor on this week. Go on over. Don’t forget to keep sending your poems in to Joseph, so he has a stockpile.

At The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele’s posts offer so much that she should be a must stop. Visit.sunday whirl This week her central focus is letting go. Head over for her tips, her suggestions, and her example poems. Like I said, Adele offers much.

At The Sunday Whirl, the words come from Time, a poem by Chris Martin. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have the new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

Over at Carry On Tuesday,  Keith has given us a phrase from the movie, Moulin Rouge. You might want to wait until you have written your poem before listening to, or reading the lyrics of, the song. Go on over.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Madeleine always writes a limerick, as an example. This week’s has two stanzas (no, I didn’t know, either). Look around while you are there. After a year and a half of posting this link, I still smile as soon as I come to it on my list. I visit because I know I will laugh and laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write.

What is going on at The Mag?! Only 41 responses to their photograph. Visit The Mag [Magpie Tales] for our first image prompt. Remember that you do not have to address the whole image, or its subject. Find some small detail that sparks you and write about that. Me, I’m fascinated with the ‘these things are forbidden’ sign.

Mary, at Poetry Jam, has a prompt that makes me want to stop and play, immediately. Head over to see all the possibilities to do with crystal, some of which might be fun to work together into a poem. Finish by listening to Tommy James and The Shondells. Of course I stopped to listen. That’s my generation’s music!

This week on Carol’s Light Words she gives us a photograph to spark a poem. Don’t forget that Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember that she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

At imaginary garden with real toads, the images in Margaret’s post are so cool, I didn’t look further. You can explore while you are over there. Visit. Investigate. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems is asking us to focus on a protagonist for a few weeks. This week, Your protagonist is having a Zen moment. Head over to read the context and suggestions.

At dVerse, Anna has a wonderful post on one of the underpinnings in the art of poetry, specifically, the role of volition and velleity. This is another case of my going no further. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. I hear they’re thinking Sangria time is coming.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. Post!

I shall see you Tuesday, for a guest prompt; Thursday for links and such; and Friday for the round-up of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
8 Comments

Posted by on 17/05/2013 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall: Pick One, Then Another

8:05 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Poems sung by Mandy Patinkin (yes, that really is the title, an exquisite little song)

Hullo, all. First, a reminder that I keep a tab at the top of my site with even more poetry prompt sites. These are sites that already have a ton of visitors, or are new and we’re trying them out. For example, this week we have a new image site and I know how much you like image prompts! Alastair’s Blog is one you can check every day, or keep handy for those days when nothing works and you need random inspiration. Alastair is mad for photography and posts an image a day. You will need, sometimes, to scroll through some inspirational quotes, as Alastair likes to collect them. Sometimes you might visit for that!

Shall we?

We start with Donna’s Put Words Together. Make Meaning and a dip into the Tow Truck archives, February last year. The exercise was fun then and still sounds fun plus, should we need one, it gives us an excuse to watch television. We are asked to, Look into the background and write down what you see there, as many details as you can. To find out the background of what, and what to do with your list of details, head to the Tow Truck.

Space held for Joseph Harker, last seen at naming constellations. [I don’t know about the rest of you Joseph followers but I don’t like my week unpunctuated by his appearances in my inbox. I hope his vacation from the world of cyber is doing him some good.]

At The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele’s posts offer so much that she should be a must stop. Visit.sunday whirl This week her central focus is forgiveness. Head over for her tips, her suggestions, and her example poems. Like I said, Adele offers much.

At The Sunday Whirl, the words come from a poem Brenda wrote during NaPoMo. I’m trying to figure out how I missed them. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have the new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

Over at Carry On Tuesday,  Keith has given us part of the title of a Neruda poem. I was so intrigued by the whole title, I stopped to read the poem. You might want to wait until you have written your poem. I’m betting on my brain forgetting. Go on over.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Look around while you are there. After a year and a half of posting this link, I still smile as soon as I come to it on my list. I visit because I know I will laugh and laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write.

Visit The Mag [Magpie Tales] for our first image prompt, a painting by Mary Cassatt. This particular painting is one where you can write a poem from the title, rather than the painting. Remember that you do not have to address the whole painting, or its subject. Find some small detail that sparks you and write about that.

Laurie at Poetry Jam, wants us to get our buzz on To find out how, or with what, head to the Jam.

This week on Carol’s Light Words we accompany her on a wander through the roses. She is showing us photographs; I feel like I am walking through a poem. Don’t forget that Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember that she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

At imaginary garden with real toads, I have given you the general address, as I can’t choose between the radio prompt, or Kerry’s Wednesday Challenge to write a Prelude. Visit. Investigate. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems is asking us to focus on a protagonist for a few weeks. This week, we are looking into red-letter days. Irene says, The idea is that the protagonist will somehow tie all your poems together so there’s a kind of storyline going on.

Ack!  Patricia K. Lichen, Author is closing down for a while. If you are curious as to why, I have given the link to her final message.  I am hoping the site remains open. Patricia’s place has the feel of walking on a beach, or through a forest, so take some time off and visit. You can still find inspiration while exploring.

At dVerse, Tony would like us to try the Terza Rima form or, even, the Terza Rima Sonnet. I love that Tony says Terza Rima is rhyming poetry written in tercets – that is three-line stanzas. So far, so straightforward, except that — you know that except is going to be a killer. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

I shall see you Tuesday, for a metaphor prompt –get your weeping and gnashing done, now; Thursday for links and such; and Friday for the round-up of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
7 Comments

Posted by on 10/05/2013 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Poetry Freeforall: There’s No Stopping Them

7:44 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Where Have All the Flowers Gone sung by The Kingston Trio

Well, hi, everyone. I think I have forgotten how to do this. I do know, Start with Donna:

We start with Donna’s Put Words Together. Make Meaning which gives us a brief look into Collin Kelley’s new book Render. She describes his poems as narrative scenarios that function much like scenes from a movie. Beyond the responsibility I feel to read a fellow Atlantan’s work, I trust Donna, having discovered several poets through her recommendations. Head over to read her review.

Visit naming constellations and read Joseph’s thoughts for the direction of his blog for the next few months. Those who have sent him poems to take apart in The Refinery, do not despair; he has not forgotten. This month of prompts has kept him reminded that he likes to create poetic exercises for us, just not every day. If you have not had time to read, or write to, Joseph’s Recursions, go. For the extended metaphor alone, you should read.

Head over to The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog. Prompts start again tomorrow, so remind yourself to check. Adele’s prompts are always wonderful. For today and a laugh, visit to read (scroll down) ‘How a Poem is Written,’ by Michael T. Young. It should resonate. Adele’s posts offer so much that she should be a must stop. Visit.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, the words come from an episode of Seinfeld. If you haven’t wordled yet, what are you waiting for? Brenda will have the new words up on Sunday. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

Over at Carry On Tuesday,  Keith has given us a familiar phrase, so the trick will be to make it fresh. As always, Keith leaves a link, this time to the origin of the phrase and to a t.v. episode. Go on over.

I have been missing my weekly laugh. We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Look around while you are there. I visit because I know I will laugh and laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write.

Visit The Mag [Magpie Tales] for our first image prompt, a painting by Helen Ward. Either you all are tired, or you aren’t sure what to make of it. Only 45 people have tried their hands. Remember that you do not have to address the whole painting, or its subject. Find some small detail that sparks you and write about that.

Alan [Alan? I was only gone a month] at Poetry Jam, wishes us to soak ourselves. To find out how, or in what, head to the Jam.

This week on Carol’s Light Words we are stopping at Dance Around Friday. Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember that she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun.

At imaginary garden with real toads, it is Transforming Friday and the last of the Eco-regions. Head over and see what Hannah wants us to do with the tropical rain forest. Those who follow Hannah know her posts are full of information, links to neat things, and discoveries. I wonder what she will transform next… Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems asks us to focus on a protagonist. We are warned that we will be living with this protagonist for a few prompts. Irene says, The idea is that the protagonist will somehow tie all your poems together so there’s a kind of storyline going on.

Patricia K. Lichen, Author offers prompts in the form of a Monday quote, her posts on nature and ecology, and the comments. I have not seen a Friday post in a couple of weeks, so will link you generally. It’s never difficult finding a spark. Patricia’s site has the feel of walking on a beach, or through a forest, so take some time off and visit.

At dVerse, Victoria has posted an essay on Voice. The poet’s voice is something we all need to be aware of, whether or not we want it to be heard. There is a prompt at the end of the essay. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If that is not enough, look straight up, at the top of the blog and you will see a tab: Even More Prompt Sites. I give the general address for each place, as it’s easy to find the prompts.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

I shall see you Tuesday, for a shake it out prompt; Thursday for links and such; and Friday for the round-up of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
3 Comments

Posted by on 03/05/2013 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Friday Poetry Freeforall: Free Day, Free Poetry

9:15 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Queen singing Bohemian Rhapsody

Hello all. I did warn you I might be shifting themes a couple of times. I loved the brightness of the last but it made my already long-ish posts longer, and stretched comments out to an alarming looking length if there were any discussion. Then I tried Balloons: font too small and side bar not at the side. So we’re back to the theme that, so far, presents better than the others.

In case you missed yesterday’s post which has links to several places for writing a poem a day during National Poetry Month, I’ll give you the link when I remember. I am going to add Adele Kenny’s blog, as I see she is participating. Now, for this weekend with its extra day!

tow-truck1We start with Donna’s Put Words Together. Make Meaning. She is off for a week, but left us with a topic to write on. It involves writing the opposite of what is, so head over to see what is.

The Refinery is on fire. This week, Marian Veverka hands over a more structured, more formal poem than we have seen. Head over to see what tack Joseph takes with this. Visit and watch a master craftsman at work and send in your poems.

Over at The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, she asks us to celebrate Spring. Whether it’s coming, or going, or won’t arrive where you live, she gives us many ideas as to how to approach this recalcitrant season. Adele’s posts offer so much that she should be a must stop. Visit.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, the words come from a poem by Dunya Mikhail. For a link to hear her read the poem head to The Whirl, but write your poem first.  Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

Carry On Tuesday gives us the title and refrain of a Beatles’ song. As always, Keith leaves a link, so go on over to listen to the song.

If Mad Kane’s Humor Blog makes me smile just when I see her blog name, imagine what it can do when actually there and reading limericks! Check out Limerick-off Mondays. Look around while you are there. I visit because I know I will laugh and laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write.

Visit The Mag [Magpie Tales] for our first image prompt, a painting by Magritte. I find Magritte’s work some of the best to write an ekphrastic poem to? on? Head over to see the image. Anyone else try to see the title of the book?

Mary at Poetry Jam, talks about the usual and the unusual in our lives. To find out what she wants us to do with them, head over.

When I realise I am scrolling through Carol’s Light Words and stopping for a little this and a little that, I give you the general address. You have choices of photographs, bits of trivia, and music to act as inspiration. Be sure to check out her Fridays. Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun. Go wander on your own.

At imaginary garden with real toads, it is Transforming Friday. Hannah is in the savanna. When I took geography, as a kid, this was the area that caught at my imagination. I loved the sound of the word and then, the denizens. Head over to read about it and maybe become part of it. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems has yet another intriguing challenge. I know; I find so many of them intriguing, but this really is. The instruction: Let your shadow write a poem. Head over to see what Neil is asking us to play with. I particularly enjoyed his discourse.

Patricia K. Lichen, Author offers prompts in the form of a Monday quote, her posts on nature and ecology, and the comments. Patricia’s site has the feel of walking on a beach, or through a forest, so take some time off and visit.

At dVerse, Poetics offers us the possibility of tea with Miss Marple. How can one resist? Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If that is not enough, look straight up, at the top of the blog and you will see a tab: Even More Prompt Sites. I give the general address for each place, as it’s easy to find the prompts.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

I shall see you Tuesday, for a prompt to celebrate National Poetry Month and your poetry; Thursday for links, probably; and Friday for the round-up of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
10 Comments

Posted by on 29/03/2013 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Friday Poetry Freeforall: Grab Bag

7:55 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to (and watching) Jake Bugg singing Lightning Bolt

Hello all. I picture us at the week’s finishing line, limping, bloodied, bandaged but here. For the weekend let’s find something to play with while we recover.

Before we start our regular list, Barbara Young is announcing a prompt a day for National Poetry Month, i.e. April. Visit her site Miz Quickly’s Impromptu Poetry Month for a feel of what we are in store for. In her About section, Barbara says, we’re not going to concentrate on building Faberge eggs.  Now and then, we’ll consider form and function, but most days we’ll be working on the marbles and screws and old silver dimes to stash. Quantities. We want to get you loose-jointed and a little bit crazy. Later, you can work on polish. Head over to see the posts she has (links in right-hand column) and get a feel for the style of prompts.

tow-truck1We start with Donna’s Put Words Together. Make Meaning. and several choices of interesting places to go. In particular, the article on Modern Poetry and the link to Susan Rich’s Big Poetry Giveaway site, are places you will want to check.

The Refinery is back in business and I am being smelted, or at least, my poem is. Joseph has some ore to work with, but that doesn’t mean you should stop sending him poems. My filter, this time, as to what to send in was for a poem that had potential but I didn’t know what to do to move it on. Now I know what to do. I have already redrafted once and am breathing again about that poem. Visit and watch a master craftsman at work.

Head over to The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog. There is so much on offer today, I almost stayed. The prompt focuses on colour. Adele gives us a wonderful list of colours and their prescribed meanings. Everyone should copy and paste it for their files. Adele also takes on adjectives with a couple of quotes that made me laugh, especially Mark Twain’s. And, then there is the prompt. Adele’s posts offer so much that she should be a must stop. Visit.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, the words come from Brenda’s Facebook newsfeed on Friday night.  The Whirl is celebrating its 100th wordle! Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

Over at Carry On Tuesday,  Keith has given us a line from novelist Baroness Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach (of course I have her in my bookshelf — you don’t? No, no, I don’t have her, but go look at her Wikipedia picture — scary). As always, Keith leaves a link, this time to quotes on age. Go on over.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays. Look around while you are there. I visit because I know I will laugh and laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write.

Visit The Mag [Magpie Tales] for our first image prompt, a painting by Picasso. I’m heading back over to see what people made of it. Only 48 people tried their hand. I find it interesting with this site to see what does and doesn’t work for writers.

Peggy at Poetry Jam, asks us to reflect on reflections. Head on over to find out the different possibilities and to see the photographs that might inspire you.

This week on Carol’s Light Words we are again stopping in at her Cloud Captions photograph. I loved this week’s photo which reminded me of a scene from Kurosawa’s Throne of Blood. Be sure to check out her Fridays. Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember that she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun. Go wander on your own.

At imaginary garden with real toads, it is Fireblossom Friday. Head over and see what she wants us to do with cracks. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems has another intriguing challenge. A clue: There’s a difference if you notice, between naming and renaming. Head over to see what Neil is asking us to play with.

Patricia K. Lichen, Author offers prompts in the form of a Monday quote, her posts on nature and ecology, and the comments. Patricia’s site has the feel of walking on a beach, or through a forest, so take some time off and visit.

At dVerse, the menu offers so much choice that I’ll let you pick, this week. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If that is not enough, look straight up, at the top of the blog and you will see a tab: Even More Prompt Sites. I give the general address for each place, as it’s easy to find the prompts.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

I shall see you Tuesday, for an image prompt; Thursday for more stuff on National Poetry Month — actually, mostly the challenge I am a part of, unless you have something on that topic you would like me to include in the post; and Friday for the round-up of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 
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Posted by on 22/03/2013 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Friday Poetry Freeforall: Spring! Winter Spring! Winter

8:07 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to Bold Thady Quill by The Clancy Brothers – my Irish is up 😉

Hullo, everyone. Ready for the weekend? I thought so. Let’s see what we have to accompany us.

tow-truck1We start with Donna’s Poetry Tow Truck, and a prompt I remember as one that took some brain adjustment on my part when I wrote to it last year. Once you get the hang of the pattern, it’s fun to work it. Start with a short phrase. Go on over to see Donna’s instructions and examples — she offers a number of approaches.

How many of you have been enjoying Joseph’s Refinery? Ah, well. The forge is silent while awaiting ore from the mines (that’s us). In case a poem arrives and knowing how quick Joseph’s young brain is, I’ll leave his general URL. To find examples of his work as a refiner, scroll down a bit, looking to the left sidebar for The Refinery.

Remind me not to let myself be distracted when I’m writing this. I caught myself looking for a poem to send in. Thirty minutes later… and I had only worked through three , or four…

Morning, noon, evening, and night — Head over to The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, to find out what Adele suggests for these times of day. Adele’s posts offer so much that she should be a must stop. Visit.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, the words come from a Netflix documentary. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

Over at Carry On Tuesday,  Keith has given us a line from an Eric Clapton song. As always, Keith leaves a link to the lyrics and to hear the song. You might want to write your poem first. Go on over.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays.  Madeleine offers three for one, this week, celebrating the second anniversary of the posting. Besides two possibilities for the limerick, we get a bit of history, so if you have wondered when and how Limerick-Off Mondays started, here’s your chance. Look around while you are there. I visit because I know I will laugh and laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write.

Visit The Mag [Magpie Tales] for our first image prompt, a photograph, by Robin Gosnall, of sea and sand. The dominant impression I got, as I looked at it, was of the different degrees of light. Might make an interesting side path for a poem.

Laurie at Poetry Jam, gives us a whole lot of fun. I just spent fifteen minutes over there, even knowing you were back here. Need a smile? She gives us the final dance from Dirty Dancing. Make it large screen and watch through the flying lift part [if you haven’t seen it]. Need a laugh? Laurie gives us The Evolution of Mom Dancing with Jimmy Fallon and a special (very special) guest. I may leave you all again to watch it. Oh, and the prompt, which has to do with dancing. Sashay over to find out what and to smile and to laugh.

This week on Carol’s Light Words we are stopping in at her Cloud Captions photograph. I am amazed at what perspective can do. I won’t say anything else other than to be curious whether anyone else takes a moment to grok the photo. The clouds are amazing. Be sure to check out her Fridays. I have them bookmarked, now. Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember that she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun. Go wander on your own.

At imaginary garden with real toads, Kerry gives us Mary’s last Mixed Bag. The prompt is intriguing. If you like to play with moral dilemmas, this one is for you. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems is asking us to play with centos… from each other’s work. Fun! I remember when they gave us a prompt last year where we gave each other lines. My favourite prompt. This one is slightly different so head over and read the possibilities as presented by Neil and Irene

Patricia K. Lichen, Author offers prompts in the form of a Monday quote, her posts on nature and ecology, and the comments. One of the topics this week is less work = slower climate change. Patricia’s site has the feel of walking on a beach, or through a forest, so take some time off and visit.

At dVerse, in Form For All, Tony talks to us about cinquains. While it may not be that hard to write one, it is hard to write a very good one. His example, Adelaide Crapsey’s ‘November Night,’ is incredibly good (she did create the American form). It took me a couple of readings to see the beauty of her structure, line breaks and sound techniques. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place. Spring is in the air and I am sensing Gimlets at the bar.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If that is not enough, look straight up, at the top of the blog and you will see a tab: Freeforall: Even More Prompt Sites. I give the general address for each place, as it’s easy to find the prompts.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

I shall see you Tuesday, for another source prompt; Thursday for stuff on National Poetry Month — actually, mostly the challenge I am a part of, unless you have something on that topic you would like me to include in the post; and Friday for the round-up of prompts.

Happy writing, everyone.

 

 
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Posted by on 15/03/2013 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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Friday Poetry Freeforall: Going, Going…

7:23 a.m. — Atlanta

listening to San Francisco by Scott McKenzie

Hullo, all. I don’t think I have ever seen weather so bi-polar. Tomorrow I head North where the weather is just as varied but thirty degrees colder. While I travel, how about the rest of you relax and write.

tow-truck1We start with Donna, at Put Words Together. Make Meaning, who seems to have run into some of the same walls many of us are finding. Read her post and then her suggestions for a possible poem. I’m thinking, something based on the structure of her post might be interesting to play with, too. Head over.

How many of you have been enjoying Joseph’s Refinery? Learning a lot? The mine is about to close down, unless more ore arrives. I thought I told you all: I want poems to take us to December. Seriously. Don’t make me come out there. If you have not participated, visit and read back through the poems where Joseph has helped several of us begin the polishing of a good piece of ore.The link takes you to the most recent, although, by tomorrow, Joseph might have a new piece. Those who have participated, don’t be shy about sending in a second poem. Joseph can always keep them as reserves. Now, people!

Over at The Music In It: Adele Kenny’s Poetry Blog, Adele asks us to ponder our concept of heaven. She suggests several ways to go, including a reminder that we don’t have to believe to write. Adele’s posts offer so much that she should be a must stop. Head over.sunday whirl

At The Sunday Whirl, the words come from Brenda’s readings on performance artist Marina Abramovic.  They are lovely words. Despite not quite getting to the point of posting a poem, I continue to draft one each week. These words go well with the week before’s. Visit to see the wordle and to read what others have done.

Over at Carry On Tuesday,  Keith’s choice this week is a couple of lines from a poem by Tupac Amaru Shakur. I love the lines and had to stop a moment to copy them down. They would work well as a refrain. As always, Keith leaves a link to information about the artist, as well as the poem. You might want to write your own first. Go on over.

We’re at Mad Kane’s Humor Blog for Limerick-off Mondays.  Madeleine offers two for one, this week. She has her regular kick-off line, and an alternative linked to the Oscars. Look around while you are there. I visit because I know I will laugh and laughing is good, so visit to read, to laugh, perhaps to write.

Visit The Mag [Magpie Tales] for our first image prompt, Venus de Milo with Drawers, by Salvador Dali . What’s that? you say. I said, Drawers. Go look. Even if you don’t write to images, go look.

Peggy at Poetry Jam, gives us ‘a  threefer ~ being logical, being illogical, being emotional’. She throws in Star Trek to balance it all out. Head over to read what she says.

This is one of those weeks when Carol’s Light Words has so much to choose from, as possible prompts, that I am giving you the general address. Be sure to check out her Fridays. I have them bookmarked, now. Carol chooses a song each Friday to get us dancing around — remember that she is on California time. A different kind of poetry and a whole lot of fun. Go wander on your own.

At imaginary garden with real toads, we have more choices, among them, a musical inspiration, and an interview with a the founder of an independent poetry and fiction collective. Go play with the toads.

We Write Poems has a fun challenge for us. I was drafting a poem by the time I finished reading the prompt. Neil asks us to remove the objectifying “the”. To find out from what, visit.

Patricia K. Lichen, Author offers prompts in the form of a Monday quote, her posts on nature and ecology, and the comments. The regular Friday post is not up yet, but there is plenty to read and see. Patricia’s site has the feel of walking on a beach, or through a forest, so take some time off and visit.

At dVerse, in Form For All, Samuel Peralta talks to us about a trireme sonnet. I am much taken with his example poem, so that goes on the list. Sigh. Visit. Look around. Stay awhile; it’s a friendly place.

Flash fiction fans: I’m going to give you the link to the general site of Flashy Fiction, rather than always giving you Friday, as you might come to the site on a different day, thus be offered a different image. Pot luck.

If that is not enough, look straight up, at the top of the blog and you will see a tab: Freeforall: Even More Prompt Sites. I give the general address for each place, as it’s easy to find the prompts.

If you have questions, ask. If you write in response to any of these, the people whose blogs you visit would love to read your responses. So, post!

Remember that the blog goes dark for a week, while I visit my grand-daughter (and my son and his wife). I shall see you Tuesday, March 12 for a prompt. Good grief, that’s already half-way through the month!

Happy writing, everyone.

P.S. Poems. To Joseph. Now. Please.

 
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Posted by on 01/03/2013 in exercises, poetry, writing

 

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